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Title: Plant-Derived Terpenes: A Feedstock for Specialty Biofuels

Abstract

Research toward renewable and sustainable energy has identified candidate terpenes capable of blending/replacing petroleum-derived jet, diesel and tactical fuels. Additionally, despite being naturally produced and stored by many plants, there are few examples of commercial recovery of terpenes from plants due to low yields. Plant terpene biosynthesis is regulated at multiple levels leading to wide variability in terpene content and chemistry. Advances in the plant molecular toolkit including annotated genomes, high-throughput omics profiling and genome-editing provides an ideal platform for high-resolution analysis and in-depth understanding of plant terpene metabolism. Concomitantly, such information is useful for bioengineering strategies of metabolic pathways for candidate terpenes. Within this paper, we review the status of terpenes as an advanced biofuel and discuss the potential of plants as a viable agronomic solution for future advanced terpene-derived biofuels.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [3];  [5];  [1]
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Biosciences Division
  2. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Biology and Soft Matter Division
  3. Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia). Research School of Biology
  4. Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Department of Plant Sciences
  5. Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States). School of Forest Resources and Conservation
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program
OSTI Identifier:
1327615
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1412011
Grant/Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725; 7428
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Trends in Biotechnology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: -; Journal Issue: -; Journal ID: ISSN 0167-7799
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; specialty biofuels; Eucalyptus; plant secondary metabolites; systems biology; synthetic biology; terpenes

Citation Formats

Mewalal, Ritesh, Rai, Durgesh K., Kainer, David, Chen, Feng, Külheim, Carsten, Peter, Gary F., and Tuskan, Gerald A. Plant-Derived Terpenes: A Feedstock for Specialty Biofuels. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1016/j.tibtech.2016.08.003.
Mewalal, Ritesh, Rai, Durgesh K., Kainer, David, Chen, Feng, Külheim, Carsten, Peter, Gary F., & Tuskan, Gerald A. Plant-Derived Terpenes: A Feedstock for Specialty Biofuels. United States. doi:10.1016/j.tibtech.2016.08.003.
Mewalal, Ritesh, Rai, Durgesh K., Kainer, David, Chen, Feng, Külheim, Carsten, Peter, Gary F., and Tuskan, Gerald A. Fri . "Plant-Derived Terpenes: A Feedstock for Specialty Biofuels". United States. doi:10.1016/j.tibtech.2016.08.003. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1327615.
@article{osti_1327615,
title = {Plant-Derived Terpenes: A Feedstock for Specialty Biofuels},
author = {Mewalal, Ritesh and Rai, Durgesh K. and Kainer, David and Chen, Feng and Külheim, Carsten and Peter, Gary F. and Tuskan, Gerald A.},
abstractNote = {Research toward renewable and sustainable energy has identified candidate terpenes capable of blending/replacing petroleum-derived jet, diesel and tactical fuels. Additionally, despite being naturally produced and stored by many plants, there are few examples of commercial recovery of terpenes from plants due to low yields. Plant terpene biosynthesis is regulated at multiple levels leading to wide variability in terpene content and chemistry. Advances in the plant molecular toolkit including annotated genomes, high-throughput omics profiling and genome-editing provides an ideal platform for high-resolution analysis and in-depth understanding of plant terpene metabolism. Concomitantly, such information is useful for bioengineering strategies of metabolic pathways for candidate terpenes. Within this paper, we review the status of terpenes as an advanced biofuel and discuss the potential of plants as a viable agronomic solution for future advanced terpene-derived biofuels.},
doi = {10.1016/j.tibtech.2016.08.003},
journal = {Trends in Biotechnology},
number = -,
volume = -,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Sep 09 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Fri Sep 09 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}

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