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Title: STEM/EELS Imaging of Magnetic Hybridization in Symmetric and Symmetry-Broken Plasmon Oligomer Dimers and All-Magnetic Fano Interference

Abstract

Negative-index metamaterials composed of magnetic plasmon oligomers are actively being investigated for their potential role in optical cloaking, superlensing, and nanolithography applications. A significant improvement to their practicality lies in the ability to function at multiple distinct wavelengths in the visible part of spectrum. Here we utilize the nanometer spatial-resolving power of electron energy-loss spectroscopy to conclusively demonstrate hybridization of magnetic plasmons in oligomer dimers that can achieve this goal. We also show that breaking the dimer’s symmetry can induce all-magnetic Fano interferences based solely on the interplay of bright and dark magnetic modes, allowing us to further tailor the system’s optical responses. These features are engineered through the design of the oligomer’s underlying nanoparticle elements as elongated Ag nanodisks with spectrally isolated long-axis plasmon resonances. The resulting magnetic plasmon oligomers and their hybridized assemblies establish a new design paradigm for optical metamaterials with rich functionality.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [1];  [1];  [4];  [1];  [1];  [5];  [3];  [6]
  1. Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry
  2. Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering
  3. Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry
  4. Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States). Dept. of Applied Mathematics
  5. Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences
  6. Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Dept. of Applied Mathematics
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22); National Science Foundation (NSF)
OSTI Identifier:
1327439
Grant/Contract Number:
SC0010536; CBET-1603780; CHE-1253775; PHY-130045; DGE-1256082
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Published Article
Journal Name:
Nano Letters
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 16; Journal Issue: 10; Journal ID: ISSN 1530-6984
Publisher:
American Chemical Society
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; electron energy-loss spectroscopy; magnetic plasmon oligomers; metamaterials; Fano interference

Citation Formats

Cherqui, Charles, Wu, Yueying, Li, Guoliang, Quillin, Steven C., Busche, Jacob A., Thakkar, Niket, West, Claire A., Montoni, Nicholas P., Rack, Philip D., Camden, Jon P., and Masiello, David J.. STEM/EELS Imaging of Magnetic Hybridization in Symmetric and Symmetry-Broken Plasmon Oligomer Dimers and All-Magnetic Fano Interference. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1021/acs.nanolett.6b03504.
Cherqui, Charles, Wu, Yueying, Li, Guoliang, Quillin, Steven C., Busche, Jacob A., Thakkar, Niket, West, Claire A., Montoni, Nicholas P., Rack, Philip D., Camden, Jon P., & Masiello, David J.. STEM/EELS Imaging of Magnetic Hybridization in Symmetric and Symmetry-Broken Plasmon Oligomer Dimers and All-Magnetic Fano Interference. United States. doi:10.1021/acs.nanolett.6b03504.
Cherqui, Charles, Wu, Yueying, Li, Guoliang, Quillin, Steven C., Busche, Jacob A., Thakkar, Niket, West, Claire A., Montoni, Nicholas P., Rack, Philip D., Camden, Jon P., and Masiello, David J.. 2016. "STEM/EELS Imaging of Magnetic Hybridization in Symmetric and Symmetry-Broken Plasmon Oligomer Dimers and All-Magnetic Fano Interference". United States. doi:10.1021/acs.nanolett.6b03504.
@article{osti_1327439,
title = {STEM/EELS Imaging of Magnetic Hybridization in Symmetric and Symmetry-Broken Plasmon Oligomer Dimers and All-Magnetic Fano Interference},
author = {Cherqui, Charles and Wu, Yueying and Li, Guoliang and Quillin, Steven C. and Busche, Jacob A. and Thakkar, Niket and West, Claire A. and Montoni, Nicholas P. and Rack, Philip D. and Camden, Jon P. and Masiello, David J.},
abstractNote = {Negative-index metamaterials composed of magnetic plasmon oligomers are actively being investigated for their potential role in optical cloaking, superlensing, and nanolithography applications. A significant improvement to their practicality lies in the ability to function at multiple distinct wavelengths in the visible part of spectrum. Here we utilize the nanometer spatial-resolving power of electron energy-loss spectroscopy to conclusively demonstrate hybridization of magnetic plasmons in oligomer dimers that can achieve this goal. We also show that breaking the dimer’s symmetry can induce all-magnetic Fano interferences based solely on the interplay of bright and dark magnetic modes, allowing us to further tailor the system’s optical responses. These features are engineered through the design of the oligomer’s underlying nanoparticle elements as elongated Ag nanodisks with spectrally isolated long-axis plasmon resonances. The resulting magnetic plasmon oligomers and their hybridized assemblies establish a new design paradigm for optical metamaterials with rich functionality.},
doi = {10.1021/acs.nanolett.6b03504},
journal = {Nano Letters},
number = 10,
volume = 16,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1021/acs.nanolett.6b03504

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