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Title: A cytometry microparticle platform approach for screening tobacco microRNA changes after agrobacterium delivery

Abstract

Abstract Key message nta-miR-398 is significantly up-regulated while nta-miR-428d is significantly down-regulated in tobacco after agroinfiltration AbstractMicroRNAs are a class of non-coding regulatory RNAs that can modulate development as well as alter innate antiviral defenses in plants. In this study we explored host changes at the microRNA level within tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana) after expression of a recombinant anti-Ebola GP1 antibody through Agrobacterium tumefaciens agroinfiltration delivery. A multiplex nanoparticle-based cytometry assay tracked the host expression changes of 53 tobacco microRNAs. Our results revealed that the most abundant microRNAs in actively growing leaves corresponded to nanoparticle probes specific to nta-mir-6149 and nta-miR-168b. After agroinfiltration, probes targeting nta-mir-398 and nta-mir-482d were significantly altered in their respective expression levels and were further verified through RT-qPCR analysis. To our knowledge this study is the first to profile microRNA expression in tobacco after agroinfiltration using a multiplex nanoparticle approach.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1327125
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-116349
Journal ID: ISSN 0167-7012
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Microbiological Methods; Journal Volume: 127
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
Agrobacterium tumefaciens; Ebola; Tobacco; Nicotiana benthamiana

Citation Formats

Powell, Joshua D., Chen, Qiang, and Mason, Hugh S. A cytometry microparticle platform approach for screening tobacco microRNA changes after agrobacterium delivery. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1016/j.mimet.2016.06.023.
Powell, Joshua D., Chen, Qiang, & Mason, Hugh S. A cytometry microparticle platform approach for screening tobacco microRNA changes after agrobacterium delivery. United States. doi:10.1016/j.mimet.2016.06.023.
Powell, Joshua D., Chen, Qiang, and Mason, Hugh S. 2016. "A cytometry microparticle platform approach for screening tobacco microRNA changes after agrobacterium delivery". United States. doi:10.1016/j.mimet.2016.06.023.
@article{osti_1327125,
title = {A cytometry microparticle platform approach for screening tobacco microRNA changes after agrobacterium delivery},
author = {Powell, Joshua D. and Chen, Qiang and Mason, Hugh S.},
abstractNote = {Abstract Key message nta-miR-398 is significantly up-regulated while nta-miR-428d is significantly down-regulated in tobacco after agroinfiltration AbstractMicroRNAs are a class of non-coding regulatory RNAs that can modulate development as well as alter innate antiviral defenses in plants. In this study we explored host changes at the microRNA level within tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana) after expression of a recombinant anti-Ebola GP1 antibody through Agrobacterium tumefaciens agroinfiltration delivery. A multiplex nanoparticle-based cytometry assay tracked the host expression changes of 53 tobacco microRNAs. Our results revealed that the most abundant microRNAs in actively growing leaves corresponded to nanoparticle probes specific to nta-mir-6149 and nta-miR-168b. After agroinfiltration, probes targeting nta-mir-398 and nta-mir-482d were significantly altered in their respective expression levels and were further verified through RT-qPCR analysis. To our knowledge this study is the first to profile microRNA expression in tobacco after agroinfiltration using a multiplex nanoparticle approach.},
doi = {10.1016/j.mimet.2016.06.023},
journal = {Journal of Microbiological Methods},
number = ,
volume = 127,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}
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