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Title: RAM-SCB simulations of electron transport and plasma wave scattering during the October 2012 “double-dip” storm

Abstract

Here, mechanisms for electron injection, trapping, and loss in the near-Earth space environment are investigated during the October 2012 “double-dip” storm using our magnetically self-consistent ring current model (RAM-SCB). Pitch angle and energy scattering are included for the first time in RAM-SCB using L and magnetic local time (MLT) dependent event-specific chorus wave models inferred from NOAA POES and Van Allen Probes EMFISIS observations. The dynamics of the source (~10s keV) and seed (~100s keV) populations of the radiation belts simulated with RAM-SCB is compared with Van Allen Probes MagEIS observations in the morning sector and with measurements from NOAA-15 satellite in the predawn and afternoon MLT sectors. We find that although the low-energy (E < 100 keV) electron fluxes are in good agreement with observations, increasing significantly by magnetospheric convection during both SYM-H dips while decreasing during the intermediate recovery phase, the injection of high-energy electrons is underestimated by this mechanism throughout the storm. Local acceleration by chorus waves intensifies the electron fluxes at E ≥ 50 keV considerably and RAM-SCB simulations overestimate the observed trapped fluxes by more than an order of magnitude; the simulated with RAM-SCB precipitating fluxes are weaker and their temporal and spatial evolution agreemore » well with POES/MEPED data.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1]; ORCiD logo [1];  [1]; ORCiD logo [1];  [3]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
  2. West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)
  3. Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1327076
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-16-20660
Journal ID: ISSN 2169-9380
Grant/Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Published Article
Journal Name:
Journal of Geophysical Research. Space Physics
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Journal of Geophysical Research. Space Physics; Journal ID: ISSN 2169-9380
Publisher:
American Geophysical Union
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES; Heliospheric and Magnetospheric Physics

Citation Formats

Jordanova, Vania Koleva, Tu, Weichao, Chen, Yue, Morley, Steven Karl, Panaitescu, Alin -Daniel, Reeves, Geoffrey D., and Kletzing, Craig A. RAM-SCB simulations of electron transport and plasma wave scattering during the October 2012 “double-dip” storm. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1002/2016JA022470.
Jordanova, Vania Koleva, Tu, Weichao, Chen, Yue, Morley, Steven Karl, Panaitescu, Alin -Daniel, Reeves, Geoffrey D., & Kletzing, Craig A. RAM-SCB simulations of electron transport and plasma wave scattering during the October 2012 “double-dip” storm. United States. doi:10.1002/2016JA022470.
Jordanova, Vania Koleva, Tu, Weichao, Chen, Yue, Morley, Steven Karl, Panaitescu, Alin -Daniel, Reeves, Geoffrey D., and Kletzing, Craig A. 2016. "RAM-SCB simulations of electron transport and plasma wave scattering during the October 2012 “double-dip” storm". United States. doi:10.1002/2016JA022470.
@article{osti_1327076,
title = {RAM-SCB simulations of electron transport and plasma wave scattering during the October 2012 “double-dip” storm},
author = {Jordanova, Vania Koleva and Tu, Weichao and Chen, Yue and Morley, Steven Karl and Panaitescu, Alin -Daniel and Reeves, Geoffrey D. and Kletzing, Craig A.},
abstractNote = {Here, mechanisms for electron injection, trapping, and loss in the near-Earth space environment are investigated during the October 2012 “double-dip” storm using our magnetically self-consistent ring current model (RAM-SCB). Pitch angle and energy scattering are included for the first time in RAM-SCB using L and magnetic local time (MLT) dependent event-specific chorus wave models inferred from NOAA POES and Van Allen Probes EMFISIS observations. The dynamics of the source (~10s keV) and seed (~100s keV) populations of the radiation belts simulated with RAM-SCB is compared with Van Allen Probes MagEIS observations in the morning sector and with measurements from NOAA-15 satellite in the predawn and afternoon MLT sectors. We find that although the low-energy (E < 100 keV) electron fluxes are in good agreement with observations, increasing significantly by magnetospheric convection during both SYM-H dips while decreasing during the intermediate recovery phase, the injection of high-energy electrons is underestimated by this mechanism throughout the storm. Local acceleration by chorus waves intensifies the electron fluxes at E ≥ 50 keV considerably and RAM-SCB simulations overestimate the observed trapped fluxes by more than an order of magnitude; the simulated with RAM-SCB precipitating fluxes are weaker and their temporal and spatial evolution agree well with POES/MEPED data.},
doi = {10.1002/2016JA022470},
journal = {Journal of Geophysical Research. Space Physics},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1002/2016JA022470

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  • Here, mechanisms for electron injection, trapping, and loss in the near-Earth space environment are investigated during the October 2012 “double-dip” storm using our magnetically self-consistent ring current model (RAM-SCB). Pitch angle and energy scattering are included for the first time in RAM-SCB using L and magnetic local time (MLT) dependent event-specific chorus wave models inferred from NOAA POES and Van Allen Probes EMFISIS observations. The dynamics of the source (~10s keV) and seed (~100s keV) populations of the radiation belts simulated with RAM-SCB is compared with Van Allen Probes MagEIS observations in the morning sector and with measurements from NOAA-15more » satellite in the predawn and afternoon MLT sectors. We find that although the low-energy (E < 100 keV) electron fluxes are in good agreement with observations, increasing significantly by magnetospheric convection during both SYM-H dips while decreasing during the intermediate recovery phase, the injection of high-energy electrons is underestimated by this mechanism throughout the storm. Local acceleration by chorus waves intensifies the electron fluxes at E ≥ 50 keV considerably and RAM-SCB simulations overestimate the observed trapped fluxes by more than an order of magnitude; the simulated with RAM-SCB precipitating fluxes are weaker and their temporal and spatial evolution agree well with POES/MEPED data.« less
  • It has been suggested that whistler mode chorus is responsible for both acceleration of MeV electrons and relativistic electron microbursts through resonant wave-particle interactions. Relativistic electron microbursts have been considered as an important loss mechanism of radiation belt electrons. Here in this paper we report on the observations of relativistic electron microbursts and flux variations of trapped MeV electrons during the 8–9 October 2012 storm, using the SAMPEX and Van Allen Probes satellites. Observations by the satellites show that relativistic electron microbursts correlate well with the rapid enhancement of trapped MeV electron fluxes by chorus wave-particle interactions, indicating that accelerationmore » by chorus is much more efficient than losses by microbursts during the storm. It is also revealed that the strong chorus wave activity without relativistic electron microbursts does not lead to significant flux variations of relativistic electrons. Thus, effective acceleration of relativistic electrons is caused by chorus that can cause relativistic electron microbursts.« less
  • Various physical processes are known to cause acceleration, loss, and transport of energetic electrons in the Earth's radiation belts, but their quantitative roles in different time and space need further investigation. During the largest storm over the past decade (17 March 2015), relativistic electrons experienced fairly rapid acceleration up to ~7 MeV within 2 days after an initial substantial dropout, as observed by Van Allen Probes. In the present paper, we evaluate the relative roles of various physical processes during the recovery phase of this large storm using a 3-D diffusion simulation. By quantitatively comparing the observed and simulated electronmore » evolution, we found that chorus plays a critical role in accelerating electrons up to several MeV near the developing peak location and produces characteristic flat-top pitch angle distributions. By only including radial diffusion, the simulation underestimates the observed electron acceleration, while radial diffusion plays an important role in redistributing electrons and potentially accelerates them to even higher energies. Moreover, plasmaspheric hiss is found to provide efficient pitch angle scattering losses for hundreds of keV electrons, while its scattering effect on > 1 MeV electrons is relatively slow. Although an additional loss process is required to fully explain the overestimated electron fluxes at multi-MeV, the combined physical processes of radial diffusion and pitch angle and energy diffusion by chorus and hiss reproduce the observed electron dynamics remarkably well, suggesting that quasi-linear diffusion theory is reasonable to evaluate radiation belt electron dynamics during this big storm.« less
  • We have modeled plasma transport in the low-latitude and equatorial ionosphere during the great magnetic storm of March 1989. Our goal was to provide a consistent explanation for the DMSP (Defense Meteorological Satellite Program) observations of dramatic decreases in ion density and rapid ion drifts in the low latitude ionosphere over South America during the storm. The modeling effort supports the hypothesis that abnormally large upward drifts lifted F region plasma above the satellite's altitude and created the density depletions observed by DMSP. Modeled O[sup +] densities at the satellite's altitude have a strong qualitative resemblance to DMSP observations. Bothmore » the model and the observations indicate a deep density through with extremely sharp boundaries surrounding the equator. The widths of both the modeled and the observed equatorial troughs increase with time. Vertical ion drifts predicted by the model also have been compared with DMSP measurements. Like the observed vertical drifts, the modeled drifts reversed sign near the trough boundaries. The modeled vertical drifts are of the same order and direction as the vertical component of E x B convection near the equator, but of opposite direction (downward) near the trough boundaries and outside of the trough. 12 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.« less