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Title: Analysis of Electric Vehicle Charging Impact on the Electric Power Grid

Abstract

In order to evaluate the impact of electric vehicles (EVs) on the distribution grid and assess their potential benefits to the future smart grid, it is crucial to study the EV charging patterns and the usage charging station. Though EVs are not yet widely adopted nationwide, a valuable methodology to conduct such studies is the statistical analysis of real-world charging data. This paper presents actual EV charging behavior of 64 EVs (5 brands, 8 models) from EV users and charging stations at Los Angeles Department of Water and Power for more than one year. Twenty-four-hour EV charging load curves have been generated and studied for various load periods: daily, monthly, seasonally and yearly. Finally, the effect and impact of EV load on the California distribution network are evaluated at different EV penetration rates.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering University of Southern California
  2. Los Angeles Department of Water and Power
  3. Smart Utility Systems
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
City of Los Angeles Department
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE)
OSTI Identifier:
1326951
Report Number(s):
DOE-USC-00192-118
DOE Contract Number:
OE0000192
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: IEEE Transmission & Distribution-Latin America (T&D LA) 2016 Morelia, Mexico Sep. 21-24, 2016
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
33 ADVANCED PROPULSION SYSTEMS

Citation Formats

Jiang, Zeming, Tian, Hao, Beshir, Mohammed J., Vohra, Surendra, and Mazloomzadeh, Ali. Analysis of Electric Vehicle Charging Impact on the Electric Power Grid. United States: N. p., 2016. Web.
Jiang, Zeming, Tian, Hao, Beshir, Mohammed J., Vohra, Surendra, & Mazloomzadeh, Ali. Analysis of Electric Vehicle Charging Impact on the Electric Power Grid. United States.
Jiang, Zeming, Tian, Hao, Beshir, Mohammed J., Vohra, Surendra, and Mazloomzadeh, Ali. 2016. "Analysis of Electric Vehicle Charging Impact on the Electric Power Grid". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1326951.
@article{osti_1326951,
title = {Analysis of Electric Vehicle Charging Impact on the Electric Power Grid},
author = {Jiang, Zeming and Tian, Hao and Beshir, Mohammed J. and Vohra, Surendra and Mazloomzadeh, Ali},
abstractNote = {In order to evaluate the impact of electric vehicles (EVs) on the distribution grid and assess their potential benefits to the future smart grid, it is crucial to study the EV charging patterns and the usage charging station. Though EVs are not yet widely adopted nationwide, a valuable methodology to conduct such studies is the statistical analysis of real-world charging data. This paper presents actual EV charging behavior of 64 EVs (5 brands, 8 models) from EV users and charging stations at Los Angeles Department of Water and Power for more than one year. Twenty-four-hour EV charging load curves have been generated and studied for various load periods: daily, monthly, seasonally and yearly. Finally, the effect and impact of EV load on the California distribution network are evaluated at different EV penetration rates.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}

Conference:
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