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Title: Do morphemes matter when reading compound words with transposed letters? Evidence from eye-tracking and event-related potentials

Abstract

We investigate the online processing consequences of encountering compound words with transposed letters (TLs), in order to determine if cross-morpheme TLs are more disruptive to reading than those within a single morpheme, as would be predicted by accounts of obligatory morpho-orthopgrahic decomposition. Two measures of online processing, eye movements and event-related potentials (ERPs), were collected in separate experiments. Participants read sentences containing correctly spelled compound words (cupcake), or compounds with TLs occurring either across morphemes (cucpake) or within one morpheme (cupacke). Results showed that between- and within-morpheme transpositions produced equal processing costs in both measures, in the form of longer reading times (Experiment 1) and a late posterior positivity (Experiment 2) that did not differ between conditions. Our findings converge to suggest that within- and between-morpheme TLs are equally disruptive to recognition, providing evidence against obligatory morpho-orthographic processing and in favour of whole-word access of English compound words during sentence reading.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States). Dept. of Psychology
  2. Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States). Dept. of Psychology and Beckman Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology
  3. Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States). Beckman Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology and Dept. of Educational Psychology
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA); National Institutes of Health (NIH)
OSTI Identifier:
1326900
Report Number(s):
SAND-2016-9308J
Journal ID: ISSN 2327-3798; 647564; TRN: US1700155
Grant/Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000; AG026308
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Language, Cognition and Neuroscience
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Language, Cognition and Neuroscience; Journal ID: ISSN 2327-3798
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
97 MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTING; 99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS; eye movements; ERPs; compound words; morphological processing; LPC/P600

Citation Formats

Stites, Mallory C., Federmeier, Kara D., and Christianson, Kiel. Do morphemes matter when reading compound words with transposed letters? Evidence from eye-tracking and event-related potentials. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1080/23273798.2016.1212082.
Stites, Mallory C., Federmeier, Kara D., & Christianson, Kiel. Do morphemes matter when reading compound words with transposed letters? Evidence from eye-tracking and event-related potentials. United States. doi:10.1080/23273798.2016.1212082.
Stites, Mallory C., Federmeier, Kara D., and Christianson, Kiel. Sat . "Do morphemes matter when reading compound words with transposed letters? Evidence from eye-tracking and event-related potentials". United States. doi:10.1080/23273798.2016.1212082. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1326900.
@article{osti_1326900,
title = {Do morphemes matter when reading compound words with transposed letters? Evidence from eye-tracking and event-related potentials},
author = {Stites, Mallory C. and Federmeier, Kara D. and Christianson, Kiel},
abstractNote = {We investigate the online processing consequences of encountering compound words with transposed letters (TLs), in order to determine if cross-morpheme TLs are more disruptive to reading than those within a single morpheme, as would be predicted by accounts of obligatory morpho-orthopgrahic decomposition. Two measures of online processing, eye movements and event-related potentials (ERPs), were collected in separate experiments. Participants read sentences containing correctly spelled compound words (cupcake), or compounds with TLs occurring either across morphemes (cucpake) or within one morpheme (cupacke). Results showed that between- and within-morpheme transpositions produced equal processing costs in both measures, in the form of longer reading times (Experiment 1) and a late posterior positivity (Experiment 2) that did not differ between conditions. Our findings converge to suggest that within- and between-morpheme TLs are equally disruptive to recognition, providing evidence against obligatory morpho-orthographic processing and in favour of whole-word access of English compound words during sentence reading.},
doi = {10.1080/23273798.2016.1212082},
journal = {Language, Cognition and Neuroscience},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Aug 06 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Sat Aug 06 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}

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