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Title: Transportation of Large Wind Components: A Review of Existing Geospatial Data

Abstract

This report features the geospatial data component of a larger project evaluating logistical and infrastructure requirements for transporting oversized and overweight (OSOW) wind components. The goal of the larger project was to assess the status and opportunities for improving the infrastructure and regulatory practices necessary to transport wind turbine towers, blades, and nacelles from current and potential manufacturing facilities to end-use markets. The purpose of this report is to summarize existing geospatial data on wind component transportation infrastructure and to provide a data gap analysis, identifying areas for further analysis and data collection.

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Policy and Systems Analysis
OSTI Identifier:
1326898
Report Number(s):
NREL/TP-6A20-67014
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
17 WIND ENERGY; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY, AND ECONOMY; transportation; wind; freight; oversized and overweight; OSOW; logistics; GIS; spatial data; data gap

Citation Formats

Mooney, Meghan, and Maclaurin, Galen. Transportation of Large Wind Components: A Review of Existing Geospatial Data. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1326898.
Mooney, Meghan, & Maclaurin, Galen. Transportation of Large Wind Components: A Review of Existing Geospatial Data. United States. doi:10.2172/1326898.
Mooney, Meghan, and Maclaurin, Galen. Thu . "Transportation of Large Wind Components: A Review of Existing Geospatial Data". United States. doi:10.2172/1326898. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1326898.
@article{osti_1326898,
title = {Transportation of Large Wind Components: A Review of Existing Geospatial Data},
author = {Mooney, Meghan and Maclaurin, Galen},
abstractNote = {This report features the geospatial data component of a larger project evaluating logistical and infrastructure requirements for transporting oversized and overweight (OSOW) wind components. The goal of the larger project was to assess the status and opportunities for improving the infrastructure and regulatory practices necessary to transport wind turbine towers, blades, and nacelles from current and potential manufacturing facilities to end-use markets. The purpose of this report is to summarize existing geospatial data on wind component transportation infrastructure and to provide a data gap analysis, identifying areas for further analysis and data collection.},
doi = {10.2172/1326898},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Thu Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}

Technical Report:

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