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Title: Transportation of Large Wind Components: A Permitting and Regulatory Review

Abstract

This report summarizes permitting and regulatory issues associated with transporting wind turbine blades, towers, and nacelles as well as large transformers (wind components). These wind components are commonly categorized as oversized and overweight (OSOW) and require specific permit approvals from state and local jurisdictions. The report was developed based on a Quadrennial Energy Review (QER) recommendation on logistical requirements for the transportation of 'oversized or high-consequence energy materials, equipment, and components.'

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Policy and Systems Analysis
OSTI Identifier:
1326891
Report Number(s):
NREL/TP-6A20-66998
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
17 WIND ENERGY; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY, AND ECONOMY; wind turbines; regulatory; permitting; oversized and overweight

Citation Formats

Levine, Aaron, and Cook, Jeff. Transportation of Large Wind Components: A Permitting and Regulatory Review. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1326891.
Levine, Aaron, & Cook, Jeff. Transportation of Large Wind Components: A Permitting and Regulatory Review. United States. doi:10.2172/1326891.
Levine, Aaron, and Cook, Jeff. 2016. "Transportation of Large Wind Components: A Permitting and Regulatory Review". United States. doi:10.2172/1326891. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1326891.
@article{osti_1326891,
title = {Transportation of Large Wind Components: A Permitting and Regulatory Review},
author = {Levine, Aaron and Cook, Jeff},
abstractNote = {This report summarizes permitting and regulatory issues associated with transporting wind turbine blades, towers, and nacelles as well as large transformers (wind components). These wind components are commonly categorized as oversized and overweight (OSOW) and require specific permit approvals from state and local jurisdictions. The report was developed based on a Quadrennial Energy Review (QER) recommendation on logistical requirements for the transportation of 'oversized or high-consequence energy materials, equipment, and components.'},
doi = {10.2172/1326891},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}

Technical Report:

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