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Title: High-energy surface and volume plasmons in nanopatterned sub-10 nm aluminum nanostructures

Abstract

In this paper, we use electron energy-loss spectroscopy to map the complete plasmonic spectrum of aluminum nanodisks with diameters ranging from 3 to 120 nm fabricated by high-resolution electron-beam lithography. Our nanopatterning approach allows us to produce localized surface plasmon resonances across a wide spectral range spanning 2–8 eV. Electromagnetic simulations using the finite element method support the existence of dipolar, quadrupolar, and hexapolar surface plasmon modes as well as centrosymmetric breathing modes depending on the location of the electron-beam excitation. In addition, we have developed an approach using nanolithography that is capable of meV control over the energy and attosecond control over the lifetime of volume plasmons in these nanodisks. The precise measurement of volume plasmon lifetime may also provide an opportunity to probe and control the DC electrical conductivity of highly confined metallic nanostructures. Lastly, we show the strong influence of the nanodisk boundary in determining both the energy and lifetime of surface plasmons and volume plasmons locally across individual aluminum nanodisks, and we have compared these observations to similar effects produced by scaling the nanodisk diameter.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [2];  [1]
  1. Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)
  2. Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1326745
Report Number(s):
BNL-112637-2016-JA
Journal ID: ISSN 1530-6984
Grant/Contract Number:
SC00112704
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Nano Letters
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 16; Journal Issue: 7; Journal ID: ISSN 1530-6984
Publisher:
American Chemical Society
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
77 NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY; catalysis; plasma processing; ethylene; carbon dioxide; Center for Functional Nanomaterials; aluminum; EELS; lithography; nanodisk; UV plasmonics; volume plasmon

Citation Formats

Hobbs, Richard G., Manfrinato, Vitor R., Yang, Yujia, Goodman, Sarah A., Zhang, Lihua, Stach, Eric A., and Berggren, Karl K.. High-energy surface and volume plasmons in nanopatterned sub-10 nm aluminum nanostructures. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1021/acs.nanolett.6b01012.
Hobbs, Richard G., Manfrinato, Vitor R., Yang, Yujia, Goodman, Sarah A., Zhang, Lihua, Stach, Eric A., & Berggren, Karl K.. High-energy surface and volume plasmons in nanopatterned sub-10 nm aluminum nanostructures. United States. doi:10.1021/acs.nanolett.6b01012.
Hobbs, Richard G., Manfrinato, Vitor R., Yang, Yujia, Goodman, Sarah A., Zhang, Lihua, Stach, Eric A., and Berggren, Karl K.. Mon . "High-energy surface and volume plasmons in nanopatterned sub-10 nm aluminum nanostructures". United States. doi:10.1021/acs.nanolett.6b01012. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1326745.
@article{osti_1326745,
title = {High-energy surface and volume plasmons in nanopatterned sub-10 nm aluminum nanostructures},
author = {Hobbs, Richard G. and Manfrinato, Vitor R. and Yang, Yujia and Goodman, Sarah A. and Zhang, Lihua and Stach, Eric A. and Berggren, Karl K.},
abstractNote = {In this paper, we use electron energy-loss spectroscopy to map the complete plasmonic spectrum of aluminum nanodisks with diameters ranging from 3 to 120 nm fabricated by high-resolution electron-beam lithography. Our nanopatterning approach allows us to produce localized surface plasmon resonances across a wide spectral range spanning 2–8 eV. Electromagnetic simulations using the finite element method support the existence of dipolar, quadrupolar, and hexapolar surface plasmon modes as well as centrosymmetric breathing modes depending on the location of the electron-beam excitation. In addition, we have developed an approach using nanolithography that is capable of meV control over the energy and attosecond control over the lifetime of volume plasmons in these nanodisks. The precise measurement of volume plasmon lifetime may also provide an opportunity to probe and control the DC electrical conductivity of highly confined metallic nanostructures. Lastly, we show the strong influence of the nanodisk boundary in determining both the energy and lifetime of surface plasmons and volume plasmons locally across individual aluminum nanodisks, and we have compared these observations to similar effects produced by scaling the nanodisk diameter.},
doi = {10.1021/acs.nanolett.6b01012},
journal = {Nano Letters},
number = 7,
volume = 16,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jun 13 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Mon Jun 13 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}

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Cited by: 9works
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