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Title: Inverse oxide/metal catalysts in fundamental studies and practical applications: A perspective of recent developments

Abstract

Inverse oxide/metal catalysts have shown to be excellent systems for studying the role of the oxide and oxide–metal interface in catalytic reactions. These systems can have special structural and catalytic properties due to strong oxide–metal interactions difficult to attain when depositing a metal on a regular oxide support. Oxide phases that are not seen or are metastable in a bulk oxide can become stable in an oxide/metal system opening the possibility for new chemical properties. Using these systems, it has been possible to explore fundamental properties of the metal–oxide interface (composition, structure, electronic state), which determine catalytic performance in the oxidation of CO, the water–gas shift and the hydrogenation of CO 2 to methanol. Recently, there has been a significant advance in the preparation of oxide/metal catalysts for technical or industrial applications. In conclusion, one goal is to identify methods able to control in a precise way the size of the deposited oxide particles and their structure on the metal substrate.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [3];  [3];  [3];  [3];  [2]
  1. Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); State Univ. of New York (SUNY), Stony Brook, NY (United States)
  2. Univ. de Sevilla, Sevilla (Spain)
  3. Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1326742
Report Number(s):
BNL-112633-2016-JA
Journal ID: ISSN 1948-7185; R&D Project: CO027; KC0302010
Grant/Contract Number:
SC00112704
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 7; Journal Issue: 13; Journal ID: ISSN 1948-7185
Publisher:
American Chemical Society
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY

Citation Formats

Rodriguez, José A., Liu, Ping, Graciani, Jesús, Senanayake, Sanjaya D., Grinter, David C., Stacchiola, Dario, Hrbek, Jan, and Fernández-Sanz, Javier. Inverse oxide/metal catalysts in fundamental studies and practical applications: A perspective of recent developments. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1021/acs.jpclett.6b00499.
Rodriguez, José A., Liu, Ping, Graciani, Jesús, Senanayake, Sanjaya D., Grinter, David C., Stacchiola, Dario, Hrbek, Jan, & Fernández-Sanz, Javier. Inverse oxide/metal catalysts in fundamental studies and practical applications: A perspective of recent developments. United States. doi:10.1021/acs.jpclett.6b00499.
Rodriguez, José A., Liu, Ping, Graciani, Jesús, Senanayake, Sanjaya D., Grinter, David C., Stacchiola, Dario, Hrbek, Jan, and Fernández-Sanz, Javier. 2016. "Inverse oxide/metal catalysts in fundamental studies and practical applications: A perspective of recent developments". United States. doi:10.1021/acs.jpclett.6b00499. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1326742.
@article{osti_1326742,
title = {Inverse oxide/metal catalysts in fundamental studies and practical applications: A perspective of recent developments},
author = {Rodriguez, José A. and Liu, Ping and Graciani, Jesús and Senanayake, Sanjaya D. and Grinter, David C. and Stacchiola, Dario and Hrbek, Jan and Fernández-Sanz, Javier},
abstractNote = {Inverse oxide/metal catalysts have shown to be excellent systems for studying the role of the oxide and oxide–metal interface in catalytic reactions. These systems can have special structural and catalytic properties due to strong oxide–metal interactions difficult to attain when depositing a metal on a regular oxide support. Oxide phases that are not seen or are metastable in a bulk oxide can become stable in an oxide/metal system opening the possibility for new chemical properties. Using these systems, it has been possible to explore fundamental properties of the metal–oxide interface (composition, structure, electronic state), which determine catalytic performance in the oxidation of CO, the water–gas shift and the hydrogenation of CO2 to methanol. Recently, there has been a significant advance in the preparation of oxide/metal catalysts for technical or industrial applications. In conclusion, one goal is to identify methods able to control in a precise way the size of the deposited oxide particles and their structure on the metal substrate.},
doi = {10.1021/acs.jpclett.6b00499},
journal = {Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters},
number = 13,
volume = 7,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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Cited by: 7works
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