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Title: Convergence in relationships between leaf traits, spectra and age across diverse canopy environments and two contrasting tropical forests

Abstract

Leaf age structures the phenology and development of plants, as well as the evolution of leaf traits over life histories. Furthermore, a general method for efficiently estimating leaf age across forests and canopy environments is lacking.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1];  [3];  [4];  [1]; ORCiD logo [5];  [1];  [1];  [6];  [2];  [7];  [8];  [1]
  1. Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)
  2. Univ. of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom)
  3. Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
  4. Univ. of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, Urbana, IL (United States)
  5. Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States)
  6. Brazil's National Institute for Amazon Research (INPA), Manaus, AM (Brazil)
  7. Centre for Ecology and Hydrology (CEH), Wallingford (United Kingdom)
  8. Embrapa Amazônia Oriental, Santarém PA (Brazil)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
OSTI Identifier:
1326738
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1400467
Report Number(s):
BNL-112628-2016-JA
Journal ID: ISSN 0028-646X; R&D Project: 21087; YN0100000
Grant/Contract Number:
SC00112704; SC0008383
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
New Phytologist
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: New Phytologist; Journal ID: ISSN 0028-646X
Publisher:
Wiley
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; spectroscopy; partial least squares regression (PLSR); vertical canopy profiles; leaf mass per area (LMA); leaf water content (LWC); vegetation indices; understory

Citation Formats

Wu, Jin, Chavana-Bryant, Cecilia, Prohaska, Neill, Serbin, Shawn P., Guan, Kaiyu, Albert, Loren P., Yang, Xi, van Leeuwen, Willem J. D., Garnello, Anthony John, Martins, Giordane, Malhi, Yadvinder, Gerard, France, Oliviera, Raimundo Cosme, and Saleska, Scott R. Convergence in relationships between leaf traits, spectra and age across diverse canopy environments and two contrasting tropical forests. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1111/nph.14051.
Wu, Jin, Chavana-Bryant, Cecilia, Prohaska, Neill, Serbin, Shawn P., Guan, Kaiyu, Albert, Loren P., Yang, Xi, van Leeuwen, Willem J. D., Garnello, Anthony John, Martins, Giordane, Malhi, Yadvinder, Gerard, France, Oliviera, Raimundo Cosme, & Saleska, Scott R. Convergence in relationships between leaf traits, spectra and age across diverse canopy environments and two contrasting tropical forests. United States. doi:10.1111/nph.14051.
Wu, Jin, Chavana-Bryant, Cecilia, Prohaska, Neill, Serbin, Shawn P., Guan, Kaiyu, Albert, Loren P., Yang, Xi, van Leeuwen, Willem J. D., Garnello, Anthony John, Martins, Giordane, Malhi, Yadvinder, Gerard, France, Oliviera, Raimundo Cosme, and Saleska, Scott R. Wed . "Convergence in relationships between leaf traits, spectra and age across diverse canopy environments and two contrasting tropical forests". United States. doi:10.1111/nph.14051. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1326738.
@article{osti_1326738,
title = {Convergence in relationships between leaf traits, spectra and age across diverse canopy environments and two contrasting tropical forests},
author = {Wu, Jin and Chavana-Bryant, Cecilia and Prohaska, Neill and Serbin, Shawn P. and Guan, Kaiyu and Albert, Loren P. and Yang, Xi and van Leeuwen, Willem J. D. and Garnello, Anthony John and Martins, Giordane and Malhi, Yadvinder and Gerard, France and Oliviera, Raimundo Cosme and Saleska, Scott R.},
abstractNote = {Leaf age structures the phenology and development of plants, as well as the evolution of leaf traits over life histories. Furthermore, a general method for efficiently estimating leaf age across forests and canopy environments is lacking.},
doi = {10.1111/nph.14051},
journal = {New Phytologist},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jul 06 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Wed Jul 06 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}

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Cited by: 5works
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  • Cited by 5
  • Here, our objective was to analyze and summarize data describing photosynthetic parameters and foliar nutrient concentrations from tropical forests in Panama to inform model representation of phosphorus (P) limitation of tropical forest productivity. Gas exchange and nutrient content data were collected from 144 observations of upper canopy leaves from at least 65 species at two forest sites in Panama, differing in species composition, rainfall and soil fertility. Photosynthetic parameters were derived from analysis of assimilation rate vs internal CO 2 concentration curves ( A/C i), and relationships with foliar nitrogen (N) and P content were developed. The relationships between area-basedmore » photosynthetic parameters and nutrients were of similar strength for N and P and robust across diverse species and site conditions. The strongest relationship expressed maximum electron transport rate (J max) as a multivariate function of both N and P, and this relationship was improved with the inclusion of independent data on wood density. Models that estimate photosynthesis from foliar N would be improved only modestly by including additional data on foliar P, but doing so may increase the capability of models to predict future conditions in P-limited tropical forests, especially when combined with data on edaphic conditions and other environmental drivers.« less
  • Leaf quantity (i.e., canopy leaf area index, LAI), quality (i.e., per-area photosynthetic capacity), and longevity all influence the photosynthetic seasonality of tropical evergreen forests. However, these components of tropical leaf phenology are poorly represented in most terrestrial biosphere models (TBMs). Here in this paper, we explored alternative options for the representation of leaf phenology effects in TBMs that employ the Farquahar, von Caemmerer & Berry (FvCB) representation of CO 2 assimilation. We developed a two-fraction leaf (sun and shade), two-layer canopy (upper and lower) photosynthesis model to evaluate different modeling approaches and assessed three components of phenological variations (i.e., leafmore » quantity, quality, and within-canopy variation in leaf longevity). Our model was driven by the prescribed seasonality of leaf quantity and quality derived from ground-based measurements within an Amazonian evergreen forest. Modeled photosynthetic seasonality was not sensitive to leaf quantity, but was highly sensitive to leaf quality and its vertical distribution within the canopy, with markedly more sensitivity to upper canopy leaf quality. This is because light absorption in tropical canopies is near maximal for the entire year, implying that seasonal changes in LAI have little impact on total canopy light absorption; and because leaf quality has a greater effect on photosynthesis of sunlit leaves than light limited, shade leaves and sunlit foliage are more abundant in the upper canopy. Our two-fraction leaf, two-layer canopy model, which accounted for all three phenological components, was able to simulate photosynthetic seasonality, explaining ~90% of the average seasonal variation in eddy covariance-derived CO 2 assimilation. This work identifies a parsimonious approach for representing tropical evergreen forest photosynthetic seasonality in TBMs that utilize the FvCB model of CO 2 assimilation and highlights the importance of incorporating more realistic phenological mechanisms in models that seek to improve the projection of future carbon dynamics in tropical evergreen forests.« less
  • Understanding the temporal patterns of leaf traits is critical in determining the seasonality and magnitude of terrestrial carbon, water, and energy fluxes. However, we lack robust and efficient ways to monitor the temporal dynamics of leaf traits. Here we assessed the potential of leaf spectroscopy to predict and monitor leaf traits across their entire life cycle at different forest sites and light environments (sunlit vs. shaded) using a weekly sampled dataset across the entire growing season at two temperate deciduous forests. In addition, the dataset includes field measured leaf-level directional-hemispherical reflectance/transmittance together with seven important leaf traits [total chlorophyll (chlorophyllmore » a and b), carotenoids, mass-based nitrogen concentration (N mass), mass-based carbon concentration (C mass), and leaf mass per area (LMA)]. All leaf traits varied significantly throughout the growing season, and displayed trait-specific temporal patterns. We used a Partial Least Square Regression (PLSR) modeling approach to estimate leaf traits from spectra, and found that PLSR was able to capture the variability across time, sites, and light environments of all leaf traits investigated (R 2 = 0.6–0.8 for temporal variability; R 2 = 0.3–0.7 for cross-site variability; R 2 = 0.4–0.8 for variability from light environments). We also tested alternative field sampling designs and found that for most leaf traits, biweekly leaf sampling throughout the growing season enabled accurate characterization of the seasonal patterns. Compared with the estimation of foliar pigments, the performance of N mass, C mass and LMA PLSR models improved more significantly with sampling frequency. Our results demonstrate that leaf spectra-trait relationships vary with time, and thus tracking the seasonality of leaf traits requires statistical models calibrated with data sampled throughout the growing season. In conclusion, our results have broad implications for future research that use vegetation spectra to infer leaf traits at different growing stages.« less
  • Cited by 4