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Title: Detection of regional infrasound signals using array data: Testing, tuning, and physical interpretation

Abstract

This work quantifies the physical characteristics of infrasound signal and noise, assesses their temporal variations, and determines the degree to which these effects can be predicted by time-varying atmospheric models to estimate array and network performance. An automated detector that accounts for both correlated and uncorrelated noise is applied to infrasound data from three seismo-acoustic arrays in South Korea (BRDAR, CHNAR, and KSGAR), cooperatively operated by Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM) and Southern Methodist University (SMU). Arrays located on an island and near the coast have higher noise power, consistent with both higher wind speeds and seasonably variable ocean wave contributions. On the basis of the adaptive F-detector quantification of time variable environmental effects, the time-dependent scaling variable is shown to be dependent on both weather conditions and local site effects. Significant seasonal variations in infrasound detections including daily time of occurrence, detection numbers, and phase velocity/azimuth estimates are documented. These time-dependent effects are strongly correlated with atmospheric winds and temperatures and are predicted by available atmospheric specifications. As a result, this suggests that commonly available atmospheric specifications can be used to predict both station and network detection performance, and an appropriate forward model improves location capabilitiesmore » as a function of time.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [3];  [4]
  1. Southern Methodist Univ., Dallas, TX (United States)
  2. Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
  3. Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources, Deajeon (Korea)
  4. Space Science Division, Naval Research Lab., Washington, D.C. (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
AFRL; USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1326653
Report Number(s):
SAND-2015-10979J
Journal ID: ISSN 0001-4966; JASMAN; 617421
Grant/Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of the Acoustical Society of America
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 140; Journal Issue: 1; Journal ID: ISSN 0001-4966
Publisher:
Acoustical Society of America
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
47 OTHER INSTRUMENTATION; infrasound; stratosphere; troposhere; ocean waves; oceans

Citation Formats

Park, Junghyun, Stump, Brian W., Hayward, Chris, Arrowsmith, Stephen J., Che, Il-Young, and Drob, Douglas P. Detection of regional infrasound signals using array data: Testing, tuning, and physical interpretation. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1121/1.4954759.
Park, Junghyun, Stump, Brian W., Hayward, Chris, Arrowsmith, Stephen J., Che, Il-Young, & Drob, Douglas P. Detection of regional infrasound signals using array data: Testing, tuning, and physical interpretation. United States. doi:10.1121/1.4954759.
Park, Junghyun, Stump, Brian W., Hayward, Chris, Arrowsmith, Stephen J., Che, Il-Young, and Drob, Douglas P. 2016. "Detection of regional infrasound signals using array data: Testing, tuning, and physical interpretation". United States. doi:10.1121/1.4954759. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1326653.
@article{osti_1326653,
title = {Detection of regional infrasound signals using array data: Testing, tuning, and physical interpretation},
author = {Park, Junghyun and Stump, Brian W. and Hayward, Chris and Arrowsmith, Stephen J. and Che, Il-Young and Drob, Douglas P.},
abstractNote = {This work quantifies the physical characteristics of infrasound signal and noise, assesses their temporal variations, and determines the degree to which these effects can be predicted by time-varying atmospheric models to estimate array and network performance. An automated detector that accounts for both correlated and uncorrelated noise is applied to infrasound data from three seismo-acoustic arrays in South Korea (BRDAR, CHNAR, and KSGAR), cooperatively operated by Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM) and Southern Methodist University (SMU). Arrays located on an island and near the coast have higher noise power, consistent with both higher wind speeds and seasonably variable ocean wave contributions. On the basis of the adaptive F-detector quantification of time variable environmental effects, the time-dependent scaling variable is shown to be dependent on both weather conditions and local site effects. Significant seasonal variations in infrasound detections including daily time of occurrence, detection numbers, and phase velocity/azimuth estimates are documented. These time-dependent effects are strongly correlated with atmospheric winds and temperatures and are predicted by available atmospheric specifications. As a result, this suggests that commonly available atmospheric specifications can be used to predict both station and network detection performance, and an appropriate forward model improves location capabilities as a function of time.},
doi = {10.1121/1.4954759},
journal = {Journal of the Acoustical Society of America},
number = 1,
volume = 140,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 7
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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