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Title: Loblolly pine productivity and water relations in response to throughfall reduction and fertilizer application on a poorly drained site in northern Florida

Abstract

Loblolly pine ( Pinus taeda L.) forests are of great ecological and economic value in the southeastern United States, where nutrient availability frequently limits productivity. The impact of fertilizer application on the growth and water relations of loblolly pine has been investigated by numerous studies; however, few field experiments have examined the effects of drought. Drought is of particular interest due to the potential for climate change to alter soil water availability. In this study, we investigated the impact of fertilizer application and a 30% reduction in throughfall on loblolly pine productivity, transpiration, hydraulic conductance, and stomatal conductance. The study was installed in a ten-year-old loblolly pine plantation on a somewhat poorly drained site in northern Florida. Throughfall reduction did not impact tree productivity or water relations of the trees. This lack of response was attributed to abundant rainfall and the ability of trees to access the shallow water table at this site. Fertilizer application increased basal area production by 20% and maximum leaf area index by 0.5 m2 m 2, but it did not affect whole-tree hydraulic conductance or the sensitivity of stomatal conductance to vapor pressure deficit. During the spring, when leaf area and vapor pressure deficit weremore » high, the fertilizer-only treatment increased monthly transpiration by 17% when compared to the control. This relationship, furthermore, was not significant during the rest of the year.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [2];  [2]; ORCiD logo [4]
  1. Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States)
  2. Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)
  3. Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States)
  4. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1326552
Grant/Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Forests
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 7; Journal Issue: 10; Journal ID: ISSN 1999-4907
Publisher:
MDPI
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; Pinus taeda; throughfall exclusion; nutrient amelioration; transpiration; stomatal conductance; sap flow

Citation Formats

Wightman, Maxwell G., Martin, Timothy A., Gonzalez-Benecke, Carlos A., Jokela, Eric J., Cropper, Jr., Wendell P., and Ward, Eric J. Loblolly pine productivity and water relations in response to throughfall reduction and fertilizer application on a poorly drained site in northern Florida. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.3390/f7100214.
Wightman, Maxwell G., Martin, Timothy A., Gonzalez-Benecke, Carlos A., Jokela, Eric J., Cropper, Jr., Wendell P., & Ward, Eric J. Loblolly pine productivity and water relations in response to throughfall reduction and fertilizer application on a poorly drained site in northern Florida. United States. doi:10.3390/f7100214.
Wightman, Maxwell G., Martin, Timothy A., Gonzalez-Benecke, Carlos A., Jokela, Eric J., Cropper, Jr., Wendell P., and Ward, Eric J. 2016. "Loblolly pine productivity and water relations in response to throughfall reduction and fertilizer application on a poorly drained site in northern Florida". United States. doi:10.3390/f7100214. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1326552.
@article{osti_1326552,
title = {Loblolly pine productivity and water relations in response to throughfall reduction and fertilizer application on a poorly drained site in northern Florida},
author = {Wightman, Maxwell G. and Martin, Timothy A. and Gonzalez-Benecke, Carlos A. and Jokela, Eric J. and Cropper, Jr., Wendell P. and Ward, Eric J.},
abstractNote = {Loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) forests are of great ecological and economic value in the southeastern United States, where nutrient availability frequently limits productivity. The impact of fertilizer application on the growth and water relations of loblolly pine has been investigated by numerous studies; however, few field experiments have examined the effects of drought. Drought is of particular interest due to the potential for climate change to alter soil water availability. In this study, we investigated the impact of fertilizer application and a 30% reduction in throughfall on loblolly pine productivity, transpiration, hydraulic conductance, and stomatal conductance. The study was installed in a ten-year-old loblolly pine plantation on a somewhat poorly drained site in northern Florida. Throughfall reduction did not impact tree productivity or water relations of the trees. This lack of response was attributed to abundant rainfall and the ability of trees to access the shallow water table at this site. Fertilizer application increased basal area production by 20% and maximum leaf area index by 0.5 m2 m 2, but it did not affect whole-tree hydraulic conductance or the sensitivity of stomatal conductance to vapor pressure deficit. During the spring, when leaf area and vapor pressure deficit were high, the fertilizer-only treatment increased monthly transpiration by 17% when compared to the control. This relationship, furthermore, was not significant during the rest of the year.},
doi = {10.3390/f7100214},
journal = {Forests},
number = 10,
volume = 7,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}

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  • Estimates of b.a./acre, number of stems/acre, mean d.b.h., 5-yr gross volume increment/acre and 5-yr mortality volume/acre were calculated for plots from 44 fertilizer trials established in the North Carolina Coastal Plain and Piedmont. Gross and net volume increment equations were developed using b.a., site index, and fertilizer treatment as predictor variables. Response to fertilization was calculated as the difference between growth estimates for control and fertilized stands at given b.a. and site index. Predicted 5-yr volume responses from fertilization with 100 lb/acre N and 50 lb/acre P are tabulated for a range of b.a. and site index, and were foundmore » to be related to stand conditions. (Refs. 8).« less
  • The effect of slit application of fertilizer tablets and sewage sludge on the growth of loblolly pine seedlings in copper mine spoils was explored. While application of fertilizer and sludge had no effect on the rate of seedling survival, seedling growth was increased by nine to 20 times after fertilizer application and three to eight times after sludge treatment, compared with untreated seedlings. Results indicate that slow-release fertilizer stimulates seedling growth on copper spoils. (1 graph, 3 photos, 14 references, 4 tables)
  • Regression analysis was used to investigate the relationship between net primary productivity (NPP) of loblolly and slash pine plantations in Beaufort County, NC. The following characteristics of the AP soil horizon were used: percent sand, silt, and clay; percentage organic matter; meq/100 g of Al, H, exchange acidity, Ca, Mg, K, CEC; ppm of Mn, and P and percentage base saturation. Atmospheric fluoride pollution was also evaluated. Exchange acidity, CEC, Mg, pH, and K were found to be significantly (P = 0.05) correlated with NPP of loblolly pine, while slash pine was significantly influenced by CEC.
  • Plots in a 7 year old plantation were treated as follows in December 1971: (a) broadleaved woody and herbaceous vegetation removed; (b) broadleaved woody vegetation removed; (c) herbaceous vegetation removed; or (d) left untreated. Overstorey species removed included Liquidambar styraciflua, Quercus nigra, Q. phellos, Ulmus alata, and Acer rubrum. Pines were thinned to 350 stems per acre in 1971, to 250 stems per acre in 1977 and to 150 stems per acrea in 1982. Trees were measured at intervals. Five year radial increment and periodic annual increment (cubic feet/acre) for ages 7-12 years and 12-17 years, and mean annual incrementmore » at 12 and 17 year old were significantly greater with treatments (a) and (b). Diameter at breast height at age 17, merchantable volume at ages 12 and 17, and sawtimber volume at age 18 were also significantly greater in (a) and (b) plots.« less
  • Wetlands north of 40 are estimated to contribute 8% of the annual atmospheric burden of methane. Several studies suggest that future emissions would be greater if northern latitudes were to become warmer. Warmer temperatures would result in, among other effects, lowering of water tables. In this study of a forest drainage site n northern Ontario, the effect of lowering the average water table on daily and seasonal methane fluxes from northern peatlands were studied. The results indicate that in a drier northern environment the net methane flux to the atmosphere from peatlands would decrease. 38 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.