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Title: DTK C/Fortran Interface Development for NEAMS FSI Simulations

Abstract

This report documents the development of DataTransferKit (DTK) C and Fortran interfaces for fluid-structure-interaction (FSI) simulations in NEAMS. In these simulations, the codes Nek5000 and Diablo are being coupled within the SHARP framework to study flow-induced vibration (FIV) in reactor steam generators. We will review the current Nek5000/Diablo coupling algorithm in SHARP and the current state of the solution transfer scheme used in this implementation. We will then present existing DTK algorithms which may be used instead to provide an improvement in both flexibility and scalability of the current SHARP implementation. We will show how these can be used within the current FSI scheme using a new set of interfaces to the algorithms developed by this work. These new interfaces currently expose the mesh-free solution transfer algorithms in DTK, a C++ library, and are written in C and Fortran to enable coupling of both Nek5000 and Diablo in their native Fortran language. They have been compiled and tested on Cooley, the test-bed machine for Mira at ALCF.

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1326527
Report Number(s):
ORNL/TM-2016/525
NT0510000; NENT026; TRN: US1700296
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
97 MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTING; 21 SPECIFIC NUCLEAR REACTORS AND ASSOCIATED PLANTS; FORTRAN; ALGORITHMS; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; STEAM GENERATORS; MATHEMATICAL SOLUTIONS; COUPLING; FLUID-STRUCTURE INTERACTIONS; MECHANICAL VIBRATIONS; N CODES; D CODES

Citation Formats

Slattery, Stuart R., and Lebrun-Grandie, Damien T. DTK C/Fortran Interface Development for NEAMS FSI Simulations. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1326527.
Slattery, Stuart R., & Lebrun-Grandie, Damien T. DTK C/Fortran Interface Development for NEAMS FSI Simulations. United States. doi:10.2172/1326527.
Slattery, Stuart R., and Lebrun-Grandie, Damien T. 2016. "DTK C/Fortran Interface Development for NEAMS FSI Simulations". United States. doi:10.2172/1326527. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1326527.
@article{osti_1326527,
title = {DTK C/Fortran Interface Development for NEAMS FSI Simulations},
author = {Slattery, Stuart R. and Lebrun-Grandie, Damien T.},
abstractNote = {This report documents the development of DataTransferKit (DTK) C and Fortran interfaces for fluid-structure-interaction (FSI) simulations in NEAMS. In these simulations, the codes Nek5000 and Diablo are being coupled within the SHARP framework to study flow-induced vibration (FIV) in reactor steam generators. We will review the current Nek5000/Diablo coupling algorithm in SHARP and the current state of the solution transfer scheme used in this implementation. We will then present existing DTK algorithms which may be used instead to provide an improvement in both flexibility and scalability of the current SHARP implementation. We will show how these can be used within the current FSI scheme using a new set of interfaces to the algorithms developed by this work. These new interfaces currently expose the mesh-free solution transfer algorithms in DTK, a C++ library, and are written in C and Fortran to enable coupling of both Nek5000 and Diablo in their native Fortran language. They have been compiled and tested on Cooley, the test-bed machine for Mira at ALCF.},
doi = {10.2172/1326527},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}

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