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Title: Report on FY16 Low-dose Metal Fuel Irradiation and PIE

Abstract

This report gives an overview of the efforts into the low-dose metal fuel irradiation and PIE as part of the Fuel Cycle Research & Development (FCRD) Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) milestone M3FT-16OR020303031. The current status of the FCT and FCRP irradiation campaigns are given including a description of the materials that have been irradiated, analysis of the passive temperature monitors, and the initial PIE efforts of the fuel samples.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE)
OSTI Identifier:
1326521
Report Number(s):
ORNL/TM-2016/507
AF5810000; NEAF224; TRN: US1700294
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
11 NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE AND FUEL MATERIALS; METALS; NUCLEAR FUELS; LOW DOSE IRRADIATION; MONITORS; POST-IRRADIATION EXAMINATION; TEMPERATURE MONITORING; TEMPERATURE RANGE 0400-1000 K

Citation Formats

Edmondson, Philip D. Report on FY16 Low-dose Metal Fuel Irradiation and PIE. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1326521.
Edmondson, Philip D. Report on FY16 Low-dose Metal Fuel Irradiation and PIE. United States. doi:10.2172/1326521.
Edmondson, Philip D. 2016. "Report on FY16 Low-dose Metal Fuel Irradiation and PIE". United States. doi:10.2172/1326521. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1326521.
@article{osti_1326521,
title = {Report on FY16 Low-dose Metal Fuel Irradiation and PIE},
author = {Edmondson, Philip D.},
abstractNote = {This report gives an overview of the efforts into the low-dose metal fuel irradiation and PIE as part of the Fuel Cycle Research & Development (FCRD) Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) milestone M3FT-16OR020303031. The current status of the FCT and FCRP irradiation campaigns are given including a description of the materials that have been irradiated, analysis of the passive temperature monitors, and the initial PIE efforts of the fuel samples.},
doi = {10.2172/1326521},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}

Technical Report:

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  • The Fuel Cycle Research and Development program of the Office of Nuclear Energy has implemented a program to develop a Uranium-Molybdenum metal fuel for light water reactors. Uranium-Molybdenum fuel has the potential to provide superior performance based on its thermo-physical properties. With sufficient development, it may be able to provide the Light Water Reactor industry with a melt-resistant, accident-tolerant fuel with improved safety response. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has been tasked with extrusion development and performing ex-reactor corrosion testing to characterize the performance of Uranium-Molybdenum fuel in both these areas. This report documents the results of the fiscal yearmore » 2016 effort to develop the Uranium-Molybdenum metal fuel concept for light water reactors.« less
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