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Title: High-molecular-weight polyvinylamine/piperazine glycinate membranes for CO 2 capture from flue gas

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1326436
Grant/Contract Number:
FE0007632
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Membrane Science
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 514; Journal Issue: C; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-03 22:02:06; Journal ID: ISSN 0376-7388
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
Netherlands
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Chen, Yuanxin, and Ho, W. S. Winston. High-molecular-weight polyvinylamine/piperazine glycinate membranes for CO 2 capture from flue gas. Netherlands: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1016/j.memsci.2016.05.005.
Chen, Yuanxin, & Ho, W. S. Winston. High-molecular-weight polyvinylamine/piperazine glycinate membranes for CO 2 capture from flue gas. Netherlands. doi:10.1016/j.memsci.2016.05.005.
Chen, Yuanxin, and Ho, W. S. Winston. 2016. "High-molecular-weight polyvinylamine/piperazine glycinate membranes for CO 2 capture from flue gas". Netherlands. doi:10.1016/j.memsci.2016.05.005.
@article{osti_1326436,
title = {High-molecular-weight polyvinylamine/piperazine glycinate membranes for CO 2 capture from flue gas},
author = {Chen, Yuanxin and Ho, W. S. Winston},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.memsci.2016.05.005},
journal = {Journal of Membrane Science},
number = C,
volume = 514,
place = {Netherlands},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1016/j.memsci.2016.05.005

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 12works
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

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