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Title: Iterative thermomechanical processing of alloy 600 for improved resistance to corrosion and stress corrosion cracking

Authors:
; ; ORCiD logo; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1326422
Grant/Contract Number:
102835; AC07-05ID14517; AC52-07NA27344; FWP# SCW0939
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Acta Materialia
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 113; Journal Issue: C; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-03 22:21:52; Journal ID: ISSN 1359-6454
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Telang, Abhishek, Gill, Amrinder S., Kumar, Mukul, Teysseyre, Sebastien, Qian, Dong, Mannava, Seetha R., and Vasudevan, Vijay K.. Iterative thermomechanical processing of alloy 600 for improved resistance to corrosion and stress corrosion cracking. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1016/j.actamat.2016.05.009.
Telang, Abhishek, Gill, Amrinder S., Kumar, Mukul, Teysseyre, Sebastien, Qian, Dong, Mannava, Seetha R., & Vasudevan, Vijay K.. Iterative thermomechanical processing of alloy 600 for improved resistance to corrosion and stress corrosion cracking. United States. doi:10.1016/j.actamat.2016.05.009.
Telang, Abhishek, Gill, Amrinder S., Kumar, Mukul, Teysseyre, Sebastien, Qian, Dong, Mannava, Seetha R., and Vasudevan, Vijay K.. 2016. "Iterative thermomechanical processing of alloy 600 for improved resistance to corrosion and stress corrosion cracking". United States. doi:10.1016/j.actamat.2016.05.009.
@article{osti_1326422,
title = {Iterative thermomechanical processing of alloy 600 for improved resistance to corrosion and stress corrosion cracking},
author = {Telang, Abhishek and Gill, Amrinder S. and Kumar, Mukul and Teysseyre, Sebastien and Qian, Dong and Mannava, Seetha R. and Vasudevan, Vijay K.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.actamat.2016.05.009},
journal = {Acta Materialia},
number = C,
volume = 113,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 7
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1016/j.actamat.2016.05.009

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 1work
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

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  • Cited by 7
  • The susceptibility of welded and unwelded samples of Al 5454 (UNS A95454) in the -O and -H34 tempers to pitting corrosion and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in chloride solutions was studied. Welded samples were fabricated using the relatively new friction stir welding (FSW) process as well as a standard gas-tungsten arc welding process for comparison. Pitting corrosion was assessed through potentiodynamic polarization experiments. U-bend and slow strain rate tests were used to determine SCC resistance. The FSW samples exhibited superior resistance to pitting corrosion compared to the base metal and arc-welded samples. U-bend tests indicated adequate SCC resistance for themore » FSW samples. However, the FSW samples exhibited discontinuities that probably were associated with remnant boundaries of the original plates. These defects resulted in intermittent increased susceptibility to pitting and, particularly for Al 5454-H34 samples, poor mechanical properties in general.« less
  • Intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of two commercial alloy 600 (UNS N06600) conditions (heat-treated at low temperature [600LT] and at high temperature [600HT]) and two controlled-purity Ni-16% Cr-9% Fe alloys (carbon-doped mill-annealed [CDMA] and carbon-doped thermally treated [CTRR]) were investigated using constant extension rate tensile (CERT) tests in primary water (0.001 M lithium hydroxide [LiOH] + 0.01 M boric acid [H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}]) with 1 bar (100 kPa) hydrogen overpressure at 360 C and 320 C. Heat treatments produced two types of microstructures in the commercial and controlled-purity alloys: one dominated by grain-boundary carbides (600HT and CDTT) and one dominatedmore » by intragranular carbides (600LT and CDMA). CERT tests were conducted over a range of strain rates and at two temperatures with interruptions at specific strains to determine the crack depth distributions. Results showed IGSCC was the dominant failure mode in all samples. For the commercial alloy and controlled-purity alloys, the microstructure with grain-boundary carbides showed delayed crack initiation and shallower crack depths than did the intragranular carbide microstructure under all experimental conditions. Data indicated a grain-boundary carbide microstructure is more resistant to IGSCC than an intragranular carbide microstructure. Observations supported the film rupture/slip dissolution mechanism and enhanced localized plasticity. The advantage of these results over previous studies was that the different carbide distributions were obtained in the same commercial alloy using different heat treatments and, in the other case, in nearly identical controlled-purity alloys. Observations of the effects of carbide distribution on IGSCC could be attributed more confidently to the carbide distribution alone rather than other potentially significant differences in microstructure or composition. Crack growth rates (CGR) increased with increasing strain rate according to a power law relation with a strain rate exponent between 0.4 and 0.64. However, CGR measured in m/unit strain decreased with increasing strain rate, indicating an effect of environment or creep. Temperature dependence of CGR was consistent with the literature.« less
  • A gamma prime strengthened nickel-base alloy was given five different heat treatments to form microstructures ranging from solution annealed to overaged. Stress corrosion tests in 50 pct NaOH and undeaerated water solutions at 316/sup 0/C showed that material that was overaged sufficiently to produce homogeneous plastic deformation possessed greatly increased resistance to stress corrosion cracking. The results suggest that the stress corrosion resistance of other nickel-base alloys could be significantly improved by suitable heat treatments.
  • Cold work accelerates stress corrosion cracking (SCC) growth rates in Alloy 600 (UNS N06600). However, the variation in crack growth rates generated from cold-worked material has been significant, and the effect has been difficult to quantify. A study was performed in hydrogenated water adjusted to pH 10.2 to evaluate systematically the effect of cold work on Alloy 600 as a function of temperature, amount of cold work, stress intensity factor, and processing orientation. Cold work was introduced into the material by tensile prestraining or cold-rolling plate product. Crack growth rates were determined between 252 C and 360 C, stress intensitymore » factors between 21 MPa{radical}m and 55 MPa{radical}m, and yield strengths between 201 MPa and 827 MPa. The material with the highest yield strength was cold-rolled and tested in the longitudinal-transverse (LT) and short-transverse (ST) orientations. Crack growth rates increased with increasing temperature, stress intensity factor, and yield strength. Furthermore, crack growth rates were a strong function of the processing orientation in the cold-rolled plate, with growth rates approximately an order of magnitude greater in the ST orientation compared to the LT orientation. Crack growth rates in the LT orientation were measured between 0.003 x 10{sup {minus}9} m/s and 1.95 x 10{sup {minus}9} m/s and between 0.066 x 10{sup {minus}9} m/s and 6.3 x 10{sup {minus}9} m/s in the ST orientation. Activation energies were slightly greater in the ST orientation, ranging from 154 kcal/mol to 191 kcal/mol, compared to activation energies between 126 kJ/mol and 157 kJ/mol in the LT orientation. Results of this study demonstrated that, although cold work can be used to accelerate SCC, the orientation of crack growth significantly can affect the results and must be taken into account when analyzing data from cold-worked material.« less