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Title: Inelastic strain recovery of a dynamically deformed unidirectional Ag Cu eutectic alloy

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1326408
Grant/Contract Number:
FG52-09NA29463
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Acta Materialia
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 113; Journal Issue: C; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-03 22:22:13; Journal ID: ISSN 1359-6454
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Kingstedt, O. T., Eftink, B. P., Robertson, I. M., and Lambros, J.. Inelastic strain recovery of a dynamically deformed unidirectional Ag Cu eutectic alloy. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1016/j.actamat.2016.04.043.
Kingstedt, O. T., Eftink, B. P., Robertson, I. M., & Lambros, J.. Inelastic strain recovery of a dynamically deformed unidirectional Ag Cu eutectic alloy. United States. doi:10.1016/j.actamat.2016.04.043.
Kingstedt, O. T., Eftink, B. P., Robertson, I. M., and Lambros, J.. 2016. "Inelastic strain recovery of a dynamically deformed unidirectional Ag Cu eutectic alloy". United States. doi:10.1016/j.actamat.2016.04.043.
@article{osti_1326408,
title = {Inelastic strain recovery of a dynamically deformed unidirectional Ag Cu eutectic alloy},
author = {Kingstedt, O. T. and Eftink, B. P. and Robertson, I. M. and Lambros, J.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.actamat.2016.04.043},
journal = {Acta Materialia},
number = C,
volume = 113,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 7
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1016/j.actamat.2016.04.043

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 1work
Citation information provided by
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