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Title: Report From BPTCS Project Team On Evaluation Of Additive Manufacturing For Pressure Retaining Equipment

Abstract

ASME is evaluating the use of additive manufacturing (AM) for the construction of pressure equipment. The information in this report assesses available AM technologies for direct metal fabrication of pressure equipment. Background information is included in the report to provide context for those not experienced in AM technology. Only commercially available technologies for direct metal fabrication are addressed in the report because these AM methods are the only viable approaches for the construction of pressure equipment. Metal AM technologies can produce near-net shape parts by using multiple layers of material from a three dimensional (3D) design model of the geometry. Additive manufacturing of metal components was developed from polymer based rapid prototyping or 3D printing. At the current maturity level, AM application for pressure equipment has the potential to reduce delivery times and costs for complex shapes. AM will also lead to a reduction in the use of high cost materials, since parts can be created with corrosion resistant layers of high alloy material and structural layers of lower cost materials.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Environmental Management (EM)
OSTI Identifier:
1326335
Report Number(s):
SRNL-STI-2016-00547
DOE Contract Number:
AC09-08SR22470
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING

Citation Formats

Rawls, G. Report From BPTCS Project Team On Evaluation Of Additive Manufacturing For Pressure Retaining Equipment. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1326335.
Rawls, G. Report From BPTCS Project Team On Evaluation Of Additive Manufacturing For Pressure Retaining Equipment. United States. doi:10.2172/1326335.
Rawls, G. 2016. "Report From BPTCS Project Team On Evaluation Of Additive Manufacturing For Pressure Retaining Equipment". United States. doi:10.2172/1326335. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1326335.
@article{osti_1326335,
title = {Report From BPTCS Project Team On Evaluation Of Additive Manufacturing For Pressure Retaining Equipment},
author = {Rawls, G.},
abstractNote = {ASME is evaluating the use of additive manufacturing (AM) for the construction of pressure equipment. The information in this report assesses available AM technologies for direct metal fabrication of pressure equipment. Background information is included in the report to provide context for those not experienced in AM technology. Only commercially available technologies for direct metal fabrication are addressed in the report because these AM methods are the only viable approaches for the construction of pressure equipment. Metal AM technologies can produce near-net shape parts by using multiple layers of material from a three dimensional (3D) design model of the geometry. Additive manufacturing of metal components was developed from polymer based rapid prototyping or 3D printing. At the current maturity level, AM application for pressure equipment has the potential to reduce delivery times and costs for complex shapes. AM will also lead to a reduction in the use of high cost materials, since parts can be created with corrosion resistant layers of high alloy material and structural layers of lower cost materials.},
doi = {10.2172/1326335},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}

Technical Report:

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