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Title: Translational Science for Energy and Beyond

Abstract

A clear challenge for the coming decades is decreasing the carbon intensity of the global energy supply while simultaneously accommodating a rapid worldwide increase in power demand. Meeting this challenge of providing abundant, clean energy undoubtedly requires synergistic efforts between basic and applied researchers in the chemical sciences to develop and deploy new technologies. Among the available options, solar energy is one of the promising targets because of the high abundance of solar photons over much of the globe. Similarly, decarbonization of the global energy supply will require clean sources of hydrogen to use as reducing equivalents for fuel and chemical feedstocks. In this report, we discuss the importance of translational research -- defined as work that explicitly targets basic discovery as well as technology development -- in the context of photovoltaics and solar fuels. We focus on three representative research programs encompassing translational research in government, industry, and academia. We then discuss more broadly the benefits and challenges of translational research models and offer recommendations for research programs that address societal challenges in the energy sector and beyond.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
1326328
Report Number(s):
NREL/JA-5900-67144
Journal ID: ISSN 0020-1669
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Inorganic Chemistry; Journal Volume: 55; Journal Issue: 18
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY, AND ECONOMY; energy supply; energy demand; clean energy

Citation Formats

McKone, James R., Crans, Debbie C., Martin, Cheryl, Turner, John, Duggal, Anil R., and Gray, Harry B. Translational Science for Energy and Beyond. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1021/acs.inorgchem.6b01097.
McKone, James R., Crans, Debbie C., Martin, Cheryl, Turner, John, Duggal, Anil R., & Gray, Harry B. Translational Science for Energy and Beyond. United States. doi:10.1021/acs.inorgchem.6b01097.
McKone, James R., Crans, Debbie C., Martin, Cheryl, Turner, John, Duggal, Anil R., and Gray, Harry B. 2016. "Translational Science for Energy and Beyond". United States. doi:10.1021/acs.inorgchem.6b01097.
@article{osti_1326328,
title = {Translational Science for Energy and Beyond},
author = {McKone, James R. and Crans, Debbie C. and Martin, Cheryl and Turner, John and Duggal, Anil R. and Gray, Harry B.},
abstractNote = {A clear challenge for the coming decades is decreasing the carbon intensity of the global energy supply while simultaneously accommodating a rapid worldwide increase in power demand. Meeting this challenge of providing abundant, clean energy undoubtedly requires synergistic efforts between basic and applied researchers in the chemical sciences to develop and deploy new technologies. Among the available options, solar energy is one of the promising targets because of the high abundance of solar photons over much of the globe. Similarly, decarbonization of the global energy supply will require clean sources of hydrogen to use as reducing equivalents for fuel and chemical feedstocks. In this report, we discuss the importance of translational research -- defined as work that explicitly targets basic discovery as well as technology development -- in the context of photovoltaics and solar fuels. We focus on three representative research programs encompassing translational research in government, industry, and academia. We then discuss more broadly the benefits and challenges of translational research models and offer recommendations for research programs that address societal challenges in the energy sector and beyond.},
doi = {10.1021/acs.inorgchem.6b01097},
journal = {Inorganic Chemistry},
number = 18,
volume = 55,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}
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  • State-to-state cross sections for rotationally inelastic collisions of HF (v,J) with Ne, Ar, and Kr have been measured. Laser pumping of the molecular beam to the initial states v = 1, J = 1--6, and v = 2, J = 2, followed by infrared fluorescence, permitted measurements of relative cross sections with Vertical Bar ..delta..J Vertical Bar< or =8. The collision energy was varied between 4 and 16 kcal/mol. These cross sections could be fitted well using an inverse-power dependence on the rotational energy gap (due to Pritchard and co-workers; J. Chem. Phys. 70, 4155 (1979)) for rotational energy transfersmore » of up to 55% of the initial translational energy. The energy-corrected sudden approximation was used to determine an ''effective'' collision length for rotationally inelastic scattering. The scattering is thought to occur predominantly on the repulsive wall of the intermolecular potential, except for the J = 1..-->..J' = 0 transition, which is shown to be sensitive to the depth of the van der Waals attractive well.« less
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