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Title: Getting to Net Zero

Abstract

The technology necessary to build net zero energy buildings (NZEBs) is ready and available today, however, building to net zero energy performance levels can be challenging. Energy efficiency measures, onsite energy generation resources, load matching and grid interaction, climatic factors, and local policies vary from location to location and require unique methods of constructing NZEBs. It is recommended that Components start looking into how to construct and operate NZEBs now as there is a learning curve to net zero construction and FY 2020 is just around the corner.

Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS)
OSTI Identifier:
1326327
Report Number(s):
NREL/FS-7A40-67081
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY, AND ECONOMY; 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; Department of Homeland Security; net zero; building effiency; E.O. 13693

Citation Formats

. Getting to Net Zero. United States: N. p., 2016. Web.
. Getting to Net Zero. United States.
. 2016. "Getting to Net Zero". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1326327.
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title = {Getting to Net Zero},
author = {},
abstractNote = {The technology necessary to build net zero energy buildings (NZEBs) is ready and available today, however, building to net zero energy performance levels can be challenging. Energy efficiency measures, onsite energy generation resources, load matching and grid interaction, climatic factors, and local policies vary from location to location and require unique methods of constructing NZEBs. It is recommended that Components start looking into how to construct and operate NZEBs now as there is a learning curve to net zero construction and FY 2020 is just around the corner.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}
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