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Title: ‘Schroedinger’s Cat’ Molecules Give Rise to Exquisitely Detailed Movies

Abstract

One of the most famous mind-twisters of the quantum world is the thought experiment known as “Schroedinger’s Cat,” in which a cat placed in a box and potentially exposed to poison is simultaneously dead and alive until someone opens the box and peeks inside. Scientists have known for a long time that an atom or molecule can also be in two different states at once. Now researchers at the Stanford PULSE Institute and the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have exploited this Schroedinger’s Cat behavior to create X-ray movies of atomic motion with much more detail than ever before.

Publication Date:
Research Org.:
SLAC (SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC), Menlo Park, CA (United States))
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1326013
Resource Type:
Multimedia
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS; SCHROEDINGER’S CAT; MOLECULES; EXCITED MOLECULES

Citation Formats

None. ‘Schroedinger’s Cat’ Molecules Give Rise to Exquisitely Detailed Movies. United States: N. p., 2016. Web.
None. ‘Schroedinger’s Cat’ Molecules Give Rise to Exquisitely Detailed Movies. United States.
None. Wed . "‘Schroedinger’s Cat’ Molecules Give Rise to Exquisitely Detailed Movies". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1326013.
@article{osti_1326013,
title = {‘Schroedinger’s Cat’ Molecules Give Rise to Exquisitely Detailed Movies},
author = {None},
abstractNote = {One of the most famous mind-twisters of the quantum world is the thought experiment known as “Schroedinger’s Cat,” in which a cat placed in a box and potentially exposed to poison is simultaneously dead and alive until someone opens the box and peeks inside. Scientists have known for a long time that an atom or molecule can also be in two different states at once. Now researchers at the Stanford PULSE Institute and the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have exploited this Schroedinger’s Cat behavior to create X-ray movies of atomic motion with much more detail than ever before.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Sep 21 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Wed Sep 21 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}
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