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Title: Derivation of Authorized Limits for Land Transfer at Los Alamos National Laboratory

Abstract

This report documents the calculation of Authorized Limits for radionuclides in soil to be used in the transfer of property by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The Authorized Limits support the evaluation process to clear land for release under different uses even though the soil contains small residual amounts of radioactivity. The Authorized Limits are developed for four exposure scenarios: residential, commercial/industrial, construction worker, and recreational. Exposure to radionuclides in soil under these scenarios is assessed for exposure routes that include incidental ingestion of soil; inhalation of soil particulates; ingestion of homegrown produce (residential only); and external irradiation from soil. Inhalation and dermal absorption of tritiated water vapor in air are also assessed.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2]
  1. Neptune and Company, Inc., Bellingham, WA (United States)
  2. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Neptune and Company, Inc., Bellingham, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1325682
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-16-27038
TRN: US1700006
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; LAND RECLAMATION; LANL; SOILS; WATER VAPOR; INGESTION; INHALATION; RADIOISOTOPES; TRITIUM OXIDES; EXTERNAL IRRADIATION; SKIN ABSORPTION; PARTICULATES; EVALUATION; PERSONNEL; RADIOACTIVITY; MAXIMUM ACCEPTABLE CONTAMINATION; LAND USE; RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS; COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS; INDUSTRIAL BUILDINGS; RECREATIONAL AREAS; Environmental monitoring and surveillance; Remediation; Environmental Protection

Citation Formats

Perona, Ralph, Whicker, Jeffrey Jay, and Mirenda, Richard J. Derivation of Authorized Limits for Land Transfer at Los Alamos National Laboratory. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1325682.
Perona, Ralph, Whicker, Jeffrey Jay, & Mirenda, Richard J. Derivation of Authorized Limits for Land Transfer at Los Alamos National Laboratory. United States. doi:10.2172/1325682.
Perona, Ralph, Whicker, Jeffrey Jay, and Mirenda, Richard J. 2016. "Derivation of Authorized Limits for Land Transfer at Los Alamos National Laboratory". United States. doi:10.2172/1325682. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1325682.
@article{osti_1325682,
title = {Derivation of Authorized Limits for Land Transfer at Los Alamos National Laboratory},
author = {Perona, Ralph and Whicker, Jeffrey Jay and Mirenda, Richard J.},
abstractNote = {This report documents the calculation of Authorized Limits for radionuclides in soil to be used in the transfer of property by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The Authorized Limits support the evaluation process to clear land for release under different uses even though the soil contains small residual amounts of radioactivity. The Authorized Limits are developed for four exposure scenarios: residential, commercial/industrial, construction worker, and recreational. Exposure to radionuclides in soil under these scenarios is assessed for exposure routes that include incidental ingestion of soil; inhalation of soil particulates; ingestion of homegrown produce (residential only); and external irradiation from soil. Inhalation and dermal absorption of tritiated water vapor in air are also assessed.},
doi = {10.2172/1325682},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}

Technical Report:

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