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Title: Guide to Using Onionskin Analysis Code (U)

Abstract

This document is a guide to using R-code written for the purpose of analyzing onionskin experiments. We expect the user to be very familiar with statistical methods and the R programming language. For more details about onionskin experiments and the statistical methods mentioned in this document see Storlie, Fugate, et al. (2013). Engineers at LANL experiment with detonators and high explosives to assess performance. The experimental unit, called an onionskin, is a hemisphere consisting of a detonator and a booster pellet surrounded by explosive material. When the detonator explodes, a streak camera mounted above the pole of the hemisphere records when the shock wave arrives at the surface. The output from the camera is a two-dimensional image that is transformed into a curve that shows the arrival time as a function of polar angle. The statistical challenge is to characterize a baseline population of arrival time curves and to compare the baseline curves to curves from a new, so-called, test series. The hope is that the new test series of curves is statistically similar to the baseline population.

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Statistical Sciences Group
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1325664
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-16-27181
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
97 MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTING; 45 MILITARY TECHNOLOGY, WEAPONRY, AND NATIONAL DEFENSE

Citation Formats

Fugate, Michael Lynn, and Morzinski, Jerome Arthur. Guide to Using Onionskin Analysis Code (U). United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1325664.
Fugate, Michael Lynn, & Morzinski, Jerome Arthur. Guide to Using Onionskin Analysis Code (U). United States. doi:10.2172/1325664.
Fugate, Michael Lynn, and Morzinski, Jerome Arthur. 2016. "Guide to Using Onionskin Analysis Code (U)". United States. doi:10.2172/1325664. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1325664.
@article{osti_1325664,
title = {Guide to Using Onionskin Analysis Code (U)},
author = {Fugate, Michael Lynn and Morzinski, Jerome Arthur},
abstractNote = {This document is a guide to using R-code written for the purpose of analyzing onionskin experiments. We expect the user to be very familiar with statistical methods and the R programming language. For more details about onionskin experiments and the statistical methods mentioned in this document see Storlie, Fugate, et al. (2013). Engineers at LANL experiment with detonators and high explosives to assess performance. The experimental unit, called an onionskin, is a hemisphere consisting of a detonator and a booster pellet surrounded by explosive material. When the detonator explodes, a streak camera mounted above the pole of the hemisphere records when the shock wave arrives at the surface. The output from the camera is a two-dimensional image that is transformed into a curve that shows the arrival time as a function of polar angle. The statistical challenge is to characterize a baseline population of arrival time curves and to compare the baseline curves to curves from a new, so-called, test series. The hope is that the new test series of curves is statistically similar to the baseline population.},
doi = {10.2172/1325664},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}

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