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Title: Process Development and Micro-Machining of MARBLE Foam-Cored Rexolite Hemi-Shell Ablator Capsules

Abstract

For this study, machined CH hemi-shell ablator capsules have been successfully produced by the MST-7 Target Fabrication Team at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Process development and micro-machining techniques have been developed to produce capsules for both the Omega and National Ignition Facility (NIF) campaigns. These capsules are gas filled up to 10 atm and consist of a machined plastic hemi-shell outer layer that accommodates various specially engineered low-density polystyrene foam cores. Machining and assembly of the two-part, step-jointed plastic hemi-shell outer layer required development of new techniques, processes, and tooling while still meeting very aggressive shot schedules for both campaigns. Finally, problems encountered and process improvements will be discussed that describe this very unique, complex capsule design approach through the first Omega proof-of-concept version to the larger NIF version.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1325636
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-15-26234
Journal ID: ISSN 1536-1055
Grant/Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Fusion Science and Technology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 70; Journal Issue: 2; Journal ID: ISSN 1536-1055
Publisher:
American Nuclear Society
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; MARBLE

Citation Formats

Randolph, Randall Blaine, Oertel, John A., Schmidt, Derek William, Lee, Matthew Nicholson, Patterson, Brian M., Henderson, Kevin C., and Hamilton, Christopher Eric. Process Development and Micro-Machining of MARBLE Foam-Cored Rexolite Hemi-Shell Ablator Capsules. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.13182/FST15-205.
Randolph, Randall Blaine, Oertel, John A., Schmidt, Derek William, Lee, Matthew Nicholson, Patterson, Brian M., Henderson, Kevin C., & Hamilton, Christopher Eric. Process Development and Micro-Machining of MARBLE Foam-Cored Rexolite Hemi-Shell Ablator Capsules. United States. doi:10.13182/FST15-205.
Randolph, Randall Blaine, Oertel, John A., Schmidt, Derek William, Lee, Matthew Nicholson, Patterson, Brian M., Henderson, Kevin C., and Hamilton, Christopher Eric. 2016. "Process Development and Micro-Machining of MARBLE Foam-Cored Rexolite Hemi-Shell Ablator Capsules". United States. doi:10.13182/FST15-205. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1325636.
@article{osti_1325636,
title = {Process Development and Micro-Machining of MARBLE Foam-Cored Rexolite Hemi-Shell Ablator Capsules},
author = {Randolph, Randall Blaine and Oertel, John A. and Schmidt, Derek William and Lee, Matthew Nicholson and Patterson, Brian M. and Henderson, Kevin C. and Hamilton, Christopher Eric},
abstractNote = {For this study, machined CH hemi-shell ablator capsules have been successfully produced by the MST-7 Target Fabrication Team at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Process development and micro-machining techniques have been developed to produce capsules for both the Omega and National Ignition Facility (NIF) campaigns. These capsules are gas filled up to 10 atm and consist of a machined plastic hemi-shell outer layer that accommodates various specially engineered low-density polystyrene foam cores. Machining and assembly of the two-part, step-jointed plastic hemi-shell outer layer required development of new techniques, processes, and tooling while still meeting very aggressive shot schedules for both campaigns. Finally, problems encountered and process improvements will be discussed that describe this very unique, complex capsule design approach through the first Omega proof-of-concept version to the larger NIF version.},
doi = {10.13182/FST15-205},
journal = {Fusion Science and Technology},
number = 2,
volume = 70,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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