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Title: Processing and Monthly Summaries of Downscaled Climate Data for Knoxville, Tennessee and Surrounding Region

Abstract

Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the City of Knoxville, Tennessee have partnered to work on a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project towards investigating climate change, mitigation, and adaptation measures in mid-sized cities. ORNL has statistically and dynamically downscaled ten Global Climate Models (GCMs) to both 1 km and 4 km resolutions. The processing and summary of those ten gridded datasets for use in a web-based tool is described. The summaries of each model are shown individually to assist in determining the similarities and differences between the model scenarios. The variables of minimum and maximum daily temperature and total monthly precipitation are summarized for the area of Knoxville, Tennessee for the periods of 1980-2005 and 2025-2050.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Computational Sciences and Engineering Division. Geographic Information Science and Technology Group
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Project
OSTI Identifier:
1325486
Report Number(s):
ORNL/TM-2016/486
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Sylvester, Linda, Omitaomu, Olufemi A., Parish, Esther S., and Allen, Melissa. Processing and Monthly Summaries of Downscaled Climate Data for Knoxville, Tennessee and Surrounding Region. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1325486.
Sylvester, Linda, Omitaomu, Olufemi A., Parish, Esther S., & Allen, Melissa. Processing and Monthly Summaries of Downscaled Climate Data for Knoxville, Tennessee and Surrounding Region. United States. doi:10.2172/1325486.
Sylvester, Linda, Omitaomu, Olufemi A., Parish, Esther S., and Allen, Melissa. 2016. "Processing and Monthly Summaries of Downscaled Climate Data for Knoxville, Tennessee and Surrounding Region". United States. doi:10.2172/1325486. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1325486.
@article{osti_1325486,
title = {Processing and Monthly Summaries of Downscaled Climate Data for Knoxville, Tennessee and Surrounding Region},
author = {Sylvester, Linda and Omitaomu, Olufemi A. and Parish, Esther S. and Allen, Melissa},
abstractNote = {Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the City of Knoxville, Tennessee have partnered to work on a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project towards investigating climate change, mitigation, and adaptation measures in mid-sized cities. ORNL has statistically and dynamically downscaled ten Global Climate Models (GCMs) to both 1 km and 4 km resolutions. The processing and summary of those ten gridded datasets for use in a web-based tool is described. The summaries of each model are shown individually to assist in determining the similarities and differences between the model scenarios. The variables of minimum and maximum daily temperature and total monthly precipitation are summarized for the area of Knoxville, Tennessee for the periods of 1980-2005 and 2025-2050.},
doi = {10.2172/1325486},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}

Technical Report:

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