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Title: Steam blowouts in California Oil and Gas District 4: Comparison of the roles of initial defects versus well aging and implications for well blowouts in geologic carbon storage projects

Authors:
ORCiD logo;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1325366
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 51; Journal Issue: C; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-04 09:56:27; Journal ID: ISSN 1750-5836
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
Netherlands
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Jordan, Preston, and Carey, J. William. Steam blowouts in California Oil and Gas District 4: Comparison of the roles of initial defects versus well aging and implications for well blowouts in geologic carbon storage projects. Netherlands: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1016/j.ijggc.2016.04.026.
Jordan, Preston, & Carey, J. William. Steam blowouts in California Oil and Gas District 4: Comparison of the roles of initial defects versus well aging and implications for well blowouts in geologic carbon storage projects. Netherlands. doi:10.1016/j.ijggc.2016.04.026.
Jordan, Preston, and Carey, J. William. Mon . "Steam blowouts in California Oil and Gas District 4: Comparison of the roles of initial defects versus well aging and implications for well blowouts in geologic carbon storage projects". Netherlands. doi:10.1016/j.ijggc.2016.04.026.
@article{osti_1325366,
title = {Steam blowouts in California Oil and Gas District 4: Comparison of the roles of initial defects versus well aging and implications for well blowouts in geologic carbon storage projects},
author = {Jordan, Preston and Carey, J. William},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.ijggc.2016.04.026},
journal = {International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control},
number = C,
volume = 51,
place = {Netherlands},
year = {Mon Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Mon Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1016/j.ijggc.2016.04.026

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  • Well blowout rates in oil fields undergoing thermally enhanced recovery (via steam injection) in California Oil and Gas District 4 from 1991 to 2005 were on the order of 1 per 1,000 well construction operations, 1 per 10,000 active wells per year, and 1 per 100,000 shut-in/idle and plugged/abandoned wells per year. This allows some initial inferences about leakage of CO2 via wells, which is considered perhaps the greatest leakage risk for geological storage of CO2. During the study period, 9% of the oil produced in the United States was from District 4, and 59% of this production was viamore » thermally enhanced recovery. There was only one possible blowout from an unknown or poorly located well, despite over a century of well drilling and production activities in the district. The blowout rate declined dramatically during the study period, most likely as a result of increasing experience, improved technology, and/or changes in safety culture. If so, this decline indicates the blowout rate in CO2-storage fields can be significantly minimized both initially and with increasing experience over time. Comparable studies should be conducted in other areas. These studies would be particularly valuable in regions with CO2-enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and natural gas storage.« less
  • Well blowouts are one type of event in hydrocarbon exploration and production that generates health, safety, environmental and financial risk. Well blowouts are variously defined as 'uncontrolled flow of well fluids and/or formation fluids from the wellbore' or 'uncontrolled flow of reservoir fluids into the wellbore'. Theoretically this is irrespective of flux rate and so would include low fluxes, often termed 'leakage'. In practice, such low-flux events are not considered well blowouts. Rather, the term well blowout applies to higher fluxes that rise to attention more acutely, typically in the order of seconds to days after the event commences. Itmore » is not unusual for insurance claims for well blowouts to exceed US$10 million. This does not imply that all blowouts are this costly, as it is likely claims are filed only for the most catastrophic events. Still, insuring against the risk of loss of well control is the costliest in the industry. The risk of well blowouts was recently quantified from an assembled database of 102 events occurring in California Oil and Gas District 4 during the period 1991 to 2005, inclusive. This article reviews those findings, updates them to a certain extent and compares them with other well blowout risk study results. It also provides an improved perspective on some of the findings. In short, this update finds that blowout rates have remained constant from 2005 to 2008 within the limits of resolution and that the decline in blowout rates from 1991 to 2005 was likely due to improved industry practice.« less
  • The United States filed suit seeking a declaration of its ownership rights in the geothermal steam and associated geothermal resources being produced by certain defendants under leases from other defendants. The United States also sought injunctive relief and damages. On a defense motion to dismiss for failure to state a claim upon which relief could be granted, and on a countermotion of the United States for summary judgment, the District Court, George B. Harris, Senior Judge, held that (1) what passed under a Stock Raising Homestead Act patent was fee title, not just the surface estate with a reservation ofmore » the subsurface, and (2) the Act's reservation of ''coal and other minerals'' to the United States did not include a reservation of geothermal steam and associated geothermal resources, since they are not ''minerals'' within the meaning of the reservation of the Act and the patents granted thereunder.« less
  • No abstract prepared.