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Title: Steam blowouts in California Oil and Gas District 4: Comparison of the roles of initial defects versus well aging and implications for well blowouts in geologic carbon storage projects

Authors:
ORCiD logo;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1325366
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 51; Journal Issue: C; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-04 09:56:27; Journal ID: ISSN 1750-5836
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
Netherlands
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Jordan, Preston, and Carey, J. William. Steam blowouts in California Oil and Gas District 4: Comparison of the roles of initial defects versus well aging and implications for well blowouts in geologic carbon storage projects. Netherlands: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1016/j.ijggc.2016.04.026.
Jordan, Preston, & Carey, J. William. Steam blowouts in California Oil and Gas District 4: Comparison of the roles of initial defects versus well aging and implications for well blowouts in geologic carbon storage projects. Netherlands. doi:10.1016/j.ijggc.2016.04.026.
Jordan, Preston, and Carey, J. William. 2016. "Steam blowouts in California Oil and Gas District 4: Comparison of the roles of initial defects versus well aging and implications for well blowouts in geologic carbon storage projects". Netherlands. doi:10.1016/j.ijggc.2016.04.026.
@article{osti_1325366,
title = {Steam blowouts in California Oil and Gas District 4: Comparison of the roles of initial defects versus well aging and implications for well blowouts in geologic carbon storage projects},
author = {Jordan, Preston and Carey, J. William},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.ijggc.2016.04.026},
journal = {International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control},
number = C,
volume = 51,
place = {Netherlands},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1016/j.ijggc.2016.04.026

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  • Well blowout rates in oil fields undergoing thermally enhanced recovery (via steam injection) in California Oil and Gas District 4 from 1991 to 2005 were on the order of 1 per 1,000 well construction operations, 1 per 10,000 active wells per year, and 1 per 100,000 shut-in/idle and plugged/abandoned wells per year. This allows some initial inferences about leakage of CO2 via wells, which is considered perhaps the greatest leakage risk for geological storage of CO2. During the study period, 9% of the oil produced in the United States was from District 4, and 59% of this production was viamore » thermally enhanced recovery. There was only one possible blowout from an unknown or poorly located well, despite over a century of well drilling and production activities in the district. The blowout rate declined dramatically during the study period, most likely as a result of increasing experience, improved technology, and/or changes in safety culture. If so, this decline indicates the blowout rate in CO2-storage fields can be significantly minimized both initially and with increasing experience over time. Comparable studies should be conducted in other areas. These studies would be particularly valuable in regions with CO2-enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and natural gas storage.« less
  • No abstract prepared.
  • Economic feasibility of geologic carbon storage demands sustaining large storage rates without damaging caprock seals. Reactivation of pre-existing or newly formed fractures may provide a leakage pathway across caprock layers. In this paper, we apply an equivalent continuum approach within a finite element framework to model the fluid-pressure-induced reactivation of pre-existing fractures within the caprock, during high-rate injection of super-critical CO 2 into a brine-saturated reservoir in a hypothetical system, using realistic geomechanical and fluid properties. We investigate the impact of reservoir to caprock layer thickness, wellbore orientation, and injection rate on overall performance of the system with respect tomore » caprock failure and leakage. We find that vertical wells result in locally higher reservoir pressures relative to horizontal injection wells for the same injection rate, with high pressure inducing caprock leakage along reactivated opening-mode fractures in the caprock. After prolonged injection, leakage along reactivated fractures in the caprock is always higher for vertical than horizontal injection wells. Furthermore, we find that low ratios of reservoir to caprock thickness favor high excess pressure and thus fracture reactivation in the caprock. Finally, injection into thick reservoir units thus lowers the risk associated with CO 2 leakage.« less