skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Canopy level emissions of 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol, monoterpenes, and sesquiterpenes from an experimental Pinus taeda plantation

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1325362
Grant/Contract Number:
FG02-95ER62083
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Science of the Total Environment
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 565; Journal Issue: C; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-04 21:14:50; Journal ID: ISSN 0048-9697
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
Netherlands
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Geron, Christopher D., Daly, Ryan W., Arnts, Robert R., Guenther, Alex B., and Mowry, Fred. L.. Canopy level emissions of 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol, monoterpenes, and sesquiterpenes from an experimental Pinus taeda plantation. Netherlands: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.05.034.
Geron, Christopher D., Daly, Ryan W., Arnts, Robert R., Guenther, Alex B., & Mowry, Fred. L.. Canopy level emissions of 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol, monoterpenes, and sesquiterpenes from an experimental Pinus taeda plantation. Netherlands. doi:10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.05.034.
Geron, Christopher D., Daly, Ryan W., Arnts, Robert R., Guenther, Alex B., and Mowry, Fred. L.. 2016. "Canopy level emissions of 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol, monoterpenes, and sesquiterpenes from an experimental Pinus taeda plantation". Netherlands. doi:10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.05.034.
@article{osti_1325362,
title = {Canopy level emissions of 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol, monoterpenes, and sesquiterpenes from an experimental Pinus taeda plantation},
author = {Geron, Christopher D. and Daly, Ryan W. and Arnts, Robert R. and Guenther, Alex B. and Mowry, Fred. L.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.05.034},
journal = {Science of the Total Environment},
number = C,
volume = 565,
place = {Netherlands},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.05.034

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 1work
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

Save / Share:
  • The mechanism of monoterpene emission from Pinus densiflora was studied using an environmentally controlled gas cabinet. It was found that monoterpene emission rate increases exponentially with temperature and is also influenced by light. These observations were explained reasonably by a mechanism whereby monoterpene emission rate depends on the monoterpene amount in the leaf oil and its saturated vapor pressure. 14 references, 2 figures, 1 table.
  • Softwood is an abundant resource; however, currently its utilization for bioconversion to obtain platform sugars is limited. Pinus taeda trees which were genetically modified to either produce S lignin or to decrease lignin content were characterized with a suite of analytic techniques. Syringyl lignin was visualized in the secondary xylem of one genetic line with Maule staining. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance identified the S lignin units were coupled into the lignin through ╬▓-O-4 linkages, and thioacidolysis measured approximately 13% S lignin content in the same sample. Reductions of the lignin of as much as 33% were observed in the transgenics.more » To better understand how these modifications affect bioconversion, their amenability to hot water and dilute acid pretreatments and enzymatic hydrolysis was evaluated. Lignin reductions resulted in 1.9-3.2-fold increases in glucose release compared to the control. However, no apparent benefit was observed by S lignin incorporation at the concentrations reported in this study. Finally, these results highlight the potential for softwood cell wall properties to be improved for bioenergy/biochemical applications.« less
  • A series of PdGe, PdSb, PdSn, and PdPb/{alpha}{minus}Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts, prepared by the controlled surface reaction (CSR) technique from organometallic precursors have been tested in the gas-phase hydrogenation of 2-methyl-1-buten-3-yne (valylene) and 2-methyl-1,3-butadiene (isoprene). On catalysts reduced at 573 K, the turnover frequencies for valylene (TON{sub v}) and isoprene (TON{sub 1}) hydrogenation were not modified by addition to the 0.09wt% Pd/{alpha}{minus}Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} base catalyst of Ge, Sb, Sn, or Pb, up to0.1 wt% (at 293 K: TON{sub v}= 20 s{sup {minus}1} and TON{sub 1} = 33 s{sup {minus}1}). Pd/{alpha}{minus}Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} reduced at 773 K was severely sinteredmore » (d{sub TEM} increased from 2.8nm to 12.4nm) and TON{sub v} and TON{sub 1} at 293 K increased to 190 and 283 s{sup {minus}1}, respectively, as a result of an apparent crystal size effect: the reactants adsorb more strongly on the smaller Pd particles. Upon alloying with Ge, Sb, Sn, or Pb and a subsequent reduction at 773 K, a modest decrease of both TON{sub v} (by a factor of 2) and TON{sub 1} (by a factor of 2{minus}5) was observed. At high conversion, both the selectivity to isoprene (S{sub I}) in valylene hydrogenation, and to olefins (S{sub 0}) in isoprene hydrogenation on Pd/{alpha}{minus}Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were improved upon alloying with Sb, Sn, or Pb (Ge had no effect). In addition, the isomerization of 2-methyl-1-butene and 3-methyl-1-butene (double bond migration reaction) during isoprene hydrogenation was partially suppressed on PdSn and PdPb/{alpha}{minus}Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The improvement in selectivities was interpreted in terms of a change in the relative adsorption strength of the reactants and intermediate products over the new bimetallic sites.« less
  • The effects of spoil type, slow-release fertilization, and weed control using glyphosate on the degree of ectomycorrhizal colonization of container-grown white (Pinus strobus L.), loblolly (P. taeda L.), and Virginia (P. virginiana Mill.) pines were studied on two strip mined sites (sandstone vs. siltstone overburden material) in southwestern Virginia. Although some seedlings were successfully colonized at both sites, the number of seedlings colonized and the proportion of short-root colonization per seedling were consistently higher on the sandstone spoil. On both sites, loblolly and Virginia pines had more ectomycorrhizal formation than white pine. Foliar P levels of all three species onmore » the sandstone spoil and of loblolly pine on the siltstone spoil were significantly correlated with ectomycorrhizal development. The degree of ectomycorrhizal formation for any of the species on either spoil was not decreased by slow-release fertilization or glyphosate applications. These results indicate that natural mycorrhizal colonization is compatible with these cultural treatments, and that colonization from indigenous fungal species may be adequate, eliminating the need for artificial inoculation.« less
  • Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MBO) photooxidation has recently been observed in both field and laboratory studies. Similar to isoprene, MBO-derived SOA increases with elevated aerosol acidity in the absence of nitric oxide; therefore, an epoxide intermediate, (3,3-dimethyloxiran-2-yl)methanol (MBO epoxide) was synthesized and tentatively proposed here to explain this enhancement. In the present study, the potential of the synthetic MBO epoxide to form SOA via reactive uptake was systematically examined. SOA was observed only in the presence of acidic aerosols. Major SOA constituents, 2,3-dihydroxyisopentanol (DHIP) and MBO-derived organosulfate isomers, were chemically characterized in both laboratory-generated SOA and inmore » ambient fine aerosols collected from the BEACHON-RoMBAS field campaign during summer 2011, where MBO emissions are substantial. Our results support epoxides as potential products of MBO photooxidation leading to formation of atmospheric SOA and suggest that reactive uptake of epoxides may generally explain acid enhancement of SOA observed from other biogenic hydrocarbons.« less