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Title: Fungal Enzymes for Bio-Products from Sustainable and Waste Biomass

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
OSTI Identifier:
1325358
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Trends in Biochemical Sciences
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 41; Journal Issue: 7; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-05 15:55:56; Journal ID: ISSN 0968-0004
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
Country unknown/Code not available
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Gupta, Vijai K., Kubicek, Christian P., Berrin, Jean-Guy, Wilson, David W., Couturier, Marie, Berlin, Alex, Filho, Edivaldo X. F., and Ezeji, Thaddeus. Fungal Enzymes for Bio-Products from Sustainable and Waste Biomass. Country unknown/Code not available: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1016/j.tibs.2016.04.006.
Gupta, Vijai K., Kubicek, Christian P., Berrin, Jean-Guy, Wilson, David W., Couturier, Marie, Berlin, Alex, Filho, Edivaldo X. F., & Ezeji, Thaddeus. Fungal Enzymes for Bio-Products from Sustainable and Waste Biomass. Country unknown/Code not available. doi:10.1016/j.tibs.2016.04.006.
Gupta, Vijai K., Kubicek, Christian P., Berrin, Jean-Guy, Wilson, David W., Couturier, Marie, Berlin, Alex, Filho, Edivaldo X. F., and Ezeji, Thaddeus. Fri . "Fungal Enzymes for Bio-Products from Sustainable and Waste Biomass". Country unknown/Code not available. doi:10.1016/j.tibs.2016.04.006.
@article{osti_1325358,
title = {Fungal Enzymes for Bio-Products from Sustainable and Waste Biomass},
author = {Gupta, Vijai K. and Kubicek, Christian P. and Berrin, Jean-Guy and Wilson, David W. and Couturier, Marie and Berlin, Alex and Filho, Edivaldo X. F. and Ezeji, Thaddeus},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.tibs.2016.04.006},
journal = {Trends in Biochemical Sciences},
number = 7,
volume = 41,
place = {Country unknown/Code not available},
year = {Fri Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Fri Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1016/j.tibs.2016.04.006

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 18works
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

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  • Leaf-cutter ants are prolific and conspicuous Neotropical herbivores that derive energy from specialized fungus gardens they cultivate using foliar biomass. The basidiomycetous cultivar of the ants, Leucoagaricus gongylophorus, produces specialized hyphal swellings called gongylidia that serve as the primary food source of ant colonies. Gongylidia also contain lignocellulases that become concentrated in ant digestive tracts and are deposited within fecal droplets onto fresh foliar material as it is foraged by the ants. Although the enzymes concentrated by L. gongylophorus within gongylidia are thought to be critical to the initial degradation of plant biomass, only a few enzymes present in thesemore » hyphal swellings have been identified. Here we use proteomic methods to identify proteins present in the gongylidia of three Atta cephalotes colonies. Our results demonstrate that a diverse but consistent set of enzymes is present in gongylidia, including numerous lignocellulases likely involved in the degradation of polysaccharides, plant toxins, and proteins. Overall, gongylidia contained over three-quarters of all lignocellulases identified in the L. gongylophorus genome, demonstrating that the majority of the enzymes produced by this fungus for biomass breakdown are ingested by the ants. We also identify a set of 23 lignocellulases enriched in gongylidia compared to whole fungus garden samples, suggesting that certain enzymes may be particularly important in the initial degradation of foliar material. Our work sheds light on the complex interplay between leaf-cutter ants and their fungal symbiont that allows for the host insects to occupy an herbivorous niche by indirectly deriving energy from plant biomass.« less
  • Leaf-cutter ants are prolific and conspicuous constituents of Neotropical ecosystems that derive energy from specialized fungus gardens they cultivate using prodigious amounts of foliar biomass. The basidiomycetous cultivar of the ants, Leucoagaricus gongylophorus, produces specialized hyphal swellings called gongylidia that serve as the primary food source of ant colonies. Gongylidia also contain plant biomass-degrading enzymes that become concentrated in ant digestive tracts and are deposited within fecal droplets onto fresh foliar material as ants incorporate it into the fungus garden. Although the enzymes concentrated by L. gongylophorus within gongylidia are thought to be critical to the initial degradation of plantmore » biomass, only a few enzymes present in these hyphal swellings have been identified. Here we use proteomic methods to identify proteins present in the gongylidia of three Atta cephalotes colonies. Our results demonstrate that a diverse but consistent set of enzymes is present in gongylidia, including numerous plant biomass-degrading enzymes likely involved in the degradation of polysaccharides, plant toxins, and proteins. Overall, gongylidia contained over three quarters of all biomass-degrading enzymes identified in the L. gongylophorus genome, demonstrating that the majority of the enzymes produced by this fungus for biomass breakdown are ingested by the ants. We also identify a set of 40 of these enzymes enriched in gongylidia compared to whole fungus garden samples, suggesting that certain enzymes may be particularly important in the initial degradation of foliar material. Our work sheds light on the complex interplay between leaf-cutter ants and their fungal symbiont that allows for the host insects to occupy an herbivorous niche by indirectly deriving energy from plant biomass.« less
  • Consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) by anaerobes, such as Clostridium thermocellum, which combine enzyme production, hydrolysis, and fermentation are promising alternatives to historical economic challenges of using fungal enzymes for biological conversion of lignocellulosic biomass. However, limited research has integrated CBP with real pretreated biomass, and understanding how pretreatment impacts subsequent deconstruction by CBP vs. fungal enzymes can provide valuable insights into CBP and suggest other novel biomass deconstruction strategies. This study focused on determining the effect of pretreatment by dilute sulfuric acid alone (DA) and with tetrahydrofuran (THF) addition via co-solvent-enhanced lignocellulosic fractionation (CELF) on deconstruction of corn stover and Populusmore » with much different recalcitrance by C. thermocellum vs. fungal enzymes and changes in pretreated biomass related to these differences.« less
  • Consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) by anaerobes, such as Clostridium thermocellum, which combine enzyme production, hydrolysis, and fermentation are promising alternatives to historical economic challenges of using fungal enzymes for biological conversion of lignocellulosic biomass. However, limited research has integrated CBP with real pretreated biomass, and understanding how pretreatment impacts subsequent deconstruction by CBP vs. fungal enzymes can provide valuable insights into CBP and suggest other novel biomass deconstruction strategies. This study focused on determining the effect of pretreatment by dilute sulfuric acid alone (DA) and with tetrahydrofuran (THF) addition via co-solvent-enhanced lignocellulosic fractionation (CELF) on deconstruction of corn stover and Populusmore » with much different recalcitrance by C. thermocellum vs. fungal enzymes and changes in pretreated biomass related to these differences.« less
  • Penicillium digitatum mycelium can accumulate uranium from aqueous solutions of uranyl chloride. Azide present during the uptake tests does not inhibit the process. Killing the fungal biomass in boiling water or by treatment with alcohols, dimethyl sulfoxide, or potassium hydroxide increases the uptake capability to about 10,000 parts per million (dry weight). Formaldehyde killing does not enhance the uranium uptake. The inference that wall-binding sites were involved led to the testing of uranium uptake by chitin, cellulose, and cellulose derivatives in microcolumns. All were active, especially chitin.