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Title: Progress in monitoring strategies for risk reduction in geologic CO 2 storage

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Fossil Energy (FE)
OSTI Identifier:
1325324
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-05CH1123; AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 51; Journal Issue: C; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-04 09:56:13; Journal ID: ISSN 1750-5836
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
Netherlands
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Harbert, William, Daley, Thomas M., Bromhal, Grant, Sullivan, Charlotte, and Huang, Lianjie. Progress in monitoring strategies for risk reduction in geologic CO 2 storage. Netherlands: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1016/j.ijggc.2016.05.007.
Harbert, William, Daley, Thomas M., Bromhal, Grant, Sullivan, Charlotte, & Huang, Lianjie. Progress in monitoring strategies for risk reduction in geologic CO 2 storage. Netherlands. doi:10.1016/j.ijggc.2016.05.007.
Harbert, William, Daley, Thomas M., Bromhal, Grant, Sullivan, Charlotte, and Huang, Lianjie. Mon . "Progress in monitoring strategies for risk reduction in geologic CO 2 storage". Netherlands. doi:10.1016/j.ijggc.2016.05.007.
@article{osti_1325324,
title = {Progress in monitoring strategies for risk reduction in geologic CO 2 storage},
author = {Harbert, William and Daley, Thomas M. and Bromhal, Grant and Sullivan, Charlotte and Huang, Lianjie},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.ijggc.2016.05.007},
journal = {International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control},
number = C,
volume = 51,
place = {Netherlands},
year = {Mon Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Mon Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1016/j.ijggc.2016.05.007

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 3works
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

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  • Cited by 31
  • The need for risk-driven field experiments for CO{sub 2} geologic storage processes to complement ongoing pilot-scale demonstrations is discussed. These risk-driven field experiments would be aimed at understanding the circumstances under which things can go wrong with a CO{sub 2} capture and storage (CCS) project and cause it to fail, as distinguished from accomplishing this end using demonstration and industrial scale sites. Such risk-driven tests would complement risk-assessment efforts that have already been carried out by providing opportunities to validate risk models. In addition to experimenting with high-risk scenarios, these controlled field experiments could help validate monitoring approaches to improvemore » performance assessment and guide development of mitigation strategies.« less
  • It is well established that fluid injection has the potential to induce earthquakes—from microseismicity to magnitude 5+ events—by altering state-of-stress conditions in the subsurface. This paper reviews recent lessons learned regarding induced seismicity at carbon storage sites. While similar to other subsurface injection practices, CO 2 injection has distinctive features that should be included in a discussion of its seismic hazard. Induced events have been observed at CO 2 injection projects, though to date it has not been a major operational issue. Nevertheless, the hazard exists and experience with this issue will likely grow as new storage operations come online.more » This review paper focuses on specific technical difficulties that can limit the effectiveness of current risk assessment and risk management approaches, and highlights recent research aimed at overcoming them. Finally, these challenges form the heart of the induced seismicity problem, and novel solutions to them will advance our ability to responsibly deploy large-scale CO 2 storage.« less
    Cited by 7
  • It is well established that fluid injection has the potential to induce earthquakes—from microseismicity to magnitude 5+ events—by altering state-of-stress conditions in the subsurface. This paper reviews recent lessons learned regarding induced seismicity at carbon storage sites. While similar to other subsurface injection practices, CO 2 injection has distinctive features that should be included in a discussion of its seismic hazard. Induced events have been observed at CO 2 injection projects, though to date it has not been a major operational issue. Nevertheless, the hazard exists and experience with this issue will likely grow as new storage operations come online.more » This review paper focuses on specific technical difficulties that can limit the effectiveness of current risk assessment and risk management approaches, and highlights recent research aimed at overcoming them. Finally, these challenges form the heart of the induced seismicity problem, and novel solutions to them will advance our ability to responsibly deploy large-scale CO 2 storage.« less