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Title: Silica support modifications to enhance Pd-catalyzed deoxygenation of stearic acid

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1325272
Grant/Contract Number:
SC0006718; FG02-03ER15457
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Applied Catalysis. B, Environmental
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 192; Journal Issue: C; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-06 22:05:20; Journal ID: ISSN 0926-3373
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
Netherlands
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Grosso-Giordano, Nicolás A., Eaton, Todd R., Bo, Zhenyu, Yacob, Sara, Yang, Chieh-Chao, and Notestein, Justin M.. Silica support modifications to enhance Pd-catalyzed deoxygenation of stearic acid. Netherlands: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1016/j.apcatb.2016.03.041.
Grosso-Giordano, Nicolás A., Eaton, Todd R., Bo, Zhenyu, Yacob, Sara, Yang, Chieh-Chao, & Notestein, Justin M.. Silica support modifications to enhance Pd-catalyzed deoxygenation of stearic acid. Netherlands. doi:10.1016/j.apcatb.2016.03.041.
Grosso-Giordano, Nicolás A., Eaton, Todd R., Bo, Zhenyu, Yacob, Sara, Yang, Chieh-Chao, and Notestein, Justin M.. 2016. "Silica support modifications to enhance Pd-catalyzed deoxygenation of stearic acid". Netherlands. doi:10.1016/j.apcatb.2016.03.041.
@article{osti_1325272,
title = {Silica support modifications to enhance Pd-catalyzed deoxygenation of stearic acid},
author = {Grosso-Giordano, Nicolás A. and Eaton, Todd R. and Bo, Zhenyu and Yacob, Sara and Yang, Chieh-Chao and Notestein, Justin M.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.apcatb.2016.03.041},
journal = {Applied Catalysis. B, Environmental},
number = C,
volume = 192,
place = {Netherlands},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1016/j.apcatb.2016.03.041

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 1work
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

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  • Supported metal catalysts containing 5 wt% Pd on silica, alumina, and activated carbon were evaluated for liquid-phase deoxygenation of stearic (octadecanoic), lauric (dodecanoic), and capric (decanoic) acids under 5 % H-2 at 300 A degrees C and 15 atm. On-line quadrupole mass spectrometry (QMS) was used to measure CO + CO2 yield, CO2 selectivity, H-2 consumption, and initial decarboxylation rate. Post-reaction analysis of liquid products by gas chromatography was used to determine n-alkane yields. The Pd/C catalyst was highly active and selective for stearic acid (SA) decarboxylation under these conditions. In contrast, SA deoxygenation over Pd/SiO2 occurred primarily via decarbonylationmore » and at a much slower rate. Pd/Al2O3 exhibited high initial SA decarboxylation activity but deactivated under the test conditions. Similar CO2 selectivity patterns among the catalysts were observed for deoxygenation of lauric and capric acids; however, the initial decarboxylation rates tended to be lower for these substrates. The influence of alkyl chain length on deoxygenation kinetics was investigated for a homologous series of C-10-C-18 fatty acids using the Pd/C catalyst. As fatty acid carbon number decreases, reaction time and H-2 consumption increase, and CO2 selectivity and initial decarboxylation rate decrease. The increase in initial decarboxylation rates for longer chain fatty acids is attributed to their greater propensity for adsorption on the activated carbon support.« less
  • Advanced biomaterials should also be bioactive with regard to desirable cellular responses, such as selective protein adsorption and cell attachment, proliferation, and differentiation. To enhance cell-material interactions, surface modifications have commonly been performed. Among the various surface modification approaches, atmospheric pressure glow discharge plasma has been used to change a hydrophobic polymer surface to a hydrophilic surface. Poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA)-derived scaffolds lack cell recognition signals and the hydrophobic nature of PLLA hinders cell seeding. To make PLLA surfaces more conducive to cell attachment and spreading, surface modifications may be used to create cell-biomaterial interfaces that elicit controlled cell adhesion andmore » maintain differentiated phenotypes. In this study, (He) gaseous atmospheric plasma glow discharge was used to change the characteristics of a 3D-type polymeric scaffold from hydrophobic to hydrophilic on both the outer and inner surfaces of the scaffold and the penetration efficiency with fibronectin was investigated. Field-emission scanning electron microscope images showed that some grooves were formed on the PLLA fibers after plasma treatment. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data also showed chemical changes in the PLLA structure. After plasma treatment, -CN (285.76 eV) was increased in C1s and -NH{sub 2} (399.70 eV) was increased significantly and –N=CH (400.80 eV) and –NH{sub 3}{sup +} (402.05 eV) were newly appeared in N1s. These changes allowed fibronectin to penetrate into the PLLA scaffold; this could be observed by confocal microscopy. In conclusion, helium atmospheric pressure plasma treatment was effective in modifying the polymeric scaffold, making it hydrophilic, and this treatment can also be used in tissue engineering research as needed to make polymers hydrophilic.« less