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Title: Bottom Fixed Platform Dynamics Models Assessing Surface Ice Interactions for Transitional Depth Structures in the Great Lakes: FAST8 – IceDyn

Abstract

To create long-term solutions for offshore wind turbines in a variety of environmental conditions, CAE tools are needed to model the design-driving loads that interact with an offshore wind turbine system during operation. This report describes our efforts in augmenting existing CAE tools used for offshore wind turbine analysis with a new module that can provide simulation capabilities for ice loading on the system. This augmentation was accomplished by creating an ice-loading module coupled to FAST8, the CAE tool maintained by the NREL for simulating land-based and offshore wind turbine dynamics. The new module includes both static and dynamic ice loading that can be applied during a dynamic simulation of the response of an offshore wind turbine. The ice forces can be prescribed, or influenced by the structure’s compliant response, or by the dynamics of both the structure and the ice floe. The new module covers ice failure modes of spalling, buckling, crushing, splitting, and bending. The supporting structure of wind turbines can be modeled as a vertical or sloping form at the waterline. The Inward Battered Guide Structure (IBGS) foundation designed by Keystone Engineering for the Great Lakes was used to study the ice models coupled to FAST8. Themore » IBGS foundation ice loading simulations in FAST8 were compared to the baseline simulation case without ice loading. The ice conditions reflecting those from Lake Huron at Port Huron and Lake Michigan at North Manitou were studied under near rated wind speed of 12 m/s for the NREL 5-MW reference turbine. Simulations were performed on ice loading models 1 through 4 and ice model 6 with their respective sub-models. The purpose of ice model 5 is to investigate ice loading on sloping structures such as ice-cones on a monopile and is not suitable for multi-membered jacketed structures like the IBGS foundation. The key response parameters from the simulations, shear forces and moments from the tower base and IBGS foundation base, were compared. Ice models 1 and 6 do not significantly affect the tower fore-aft shear and moment. However, ice model 2 (dynamic analyses), model 3 (random ice loading), and model 4 (multiple ice failure zone loading) show increased effect on the tower fore-aft shear and moment with significant effect from ice model 3.1. In general ice loading creates large reaction forces and moments at the base of the IBGS foundation; the largest occurred in model 1.1 (steady creep ice indentation loading) followed by model 3.1 (random creep ice indentation loading). In general the power production from the ice loading cases had little deviation from the baseline case without ice loading. For ultimate limit state (ULS), ice model 1.1 ice and 3.1 appear to be the ice most critical models to consider at an early stage of design. Ice model 4 is an important tool for assessing structural fatigue.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)
  2. Principle Power, Inc., Emeryville, CA (United States)
  3. National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Wind and Water Technologies Office (EE-4W)
OSTI Identifier:
1325200
Report Number(s):
DOE-MICHIGAN-0005478
DOE Contract Number:
EE0005478
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
17 WIND ENERGY; FAST8; Wind Energy; Turbines

Citation Formats

Karr, Dale G., Yu, Bingbin, and Sirnivas, Senu. Bottom Fixed Platform Dynamics Models Assessing Surface Ice Interactions for Transitional Depth Structures in the Great Lakes: FAST8 – IceDyn. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.2172/1325200.
Karr, Dale G., Yu, Bingbin, & Sirnivas, Senu. Bottom Fixed Platform Dynamics Models Assessing Surface Ice Interactions for Transitional Depth Structures in the Great Lakes: FAST8 – IceDyn. United States. doi:10.2172/1325200.
Karr, Dale G., Yu, Bingbin, and Sirnivas, Senu. 2015. "Bottom Fixed Platform Dynamics Models Assessing Surface Ice Interactions for Transitional Depth Structures in the Great Lakes: FAST8 – IceDyn". United States. doi:10.2172/1325200. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1325200.
@article{osti_1325200,
title = {Bottom Fixed Platform Dynamics Models Assessing Surface Ice Interactions for Transitional Depth Structures in the Great Lakes: FAST8 – IceDyn},
author = {Karr, Dale G. and Yu, Bingbin and Sirnivas, Senu},
abstractNote = {To create long-term solutions for offshore wind turbines in a variety of environmental conditions, CAE tools are needed to model the design-driving loads that interact with an offshore wind turbine system during operation. This report describes our efforts in augmenting existing CAE tools used for offshore wind turbine analysis with a new module that can provide simulation capabilities for ice loading on the system. This augmentation was accomplished by creating an ice-loading module coupled to FAST8, the CAE tool maintained by the NREL for simulating land-based and offshore wind turbine dynamics. The new module includes both static and dynamic ice loading that can be applied during a dynamic simulation of the response of an offshore wind turbine. The ice forces can be prescribed, or influenced by the structure’s compliant response, or by the dynamics of both the structure and the ice floe. The new module covers ice failure modes of spalling, buckling, crushing, splitting, and bending. The supporting structure of wind turbines can be modeled as a vertical or sloping form at the waterline. The Inward Battered Guide Structure (IBGS) foundation designed by Keystone Engineering for the Great Lakes was used to study the ice models coupled to FAST8. The IBGS foundation ice loading simulations in FAST8 were compared to the baseline simulation case without ice loading. The ice conditions reflecting those from Lake Huron at Port Huron and Lake Michigan at North Manitou were studied under near rated wind speed of 12 m/s for the NREL 5-MW reference turbine. Simulations were performed on ice loading models 1 through 4 and ice model 6 with their respective sub-models. The purpose of ice model 5 is to investigate ice loading on sloping structures such as ice-cones on a monopile and is not suitable for multi-membered jacketed structures like the IBGS foundation. The key response parameters from the simulations, shear forces and moments from the tower base and IBGS foundation base, were compared. Ice models 1 and 6 do not significantly affect the tower fore-aft shear and moment. However, ice model 2 (dynamic analyses), model 3 (random ice loading), and model 4 (multiple ice failure zone loading) show increased effect on the tower fore-aft shear and moment with significant effect from ice model 3.1. In general ice loading creates large reaction forces and moments at the base of the IBGS foundation; the largest occurred in model 1.1 (steady creep ice indentation loading) followed by model 3.1 (random creep ice indentation loading). In general the power production from the ice loading cases had little deviation from the baseline case without ice loading. For ultimate limit state (ULS), ice model 1.1 ice and 3.1 appear to be the ice most critical models to consider at an early stage of design. Ice model 4 is an important tool for assessing structural fatigue.},
doi = {10.2172/1325200},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2015,
month = 4
}

Technical Report:

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