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Title: Hyperspectral fluorescence microscopy detects autofluorescent factors that can be exploited as a diagnostic method for Candida species differentiation

Abstract

Fungi in the Candida genus are the most common fungal pathogens. They not only cause high morbidity and mortality but can also cost billions of dollars in healthcare. To alleviate this burden, early and accurate identification of Candida species is necessary. However, standard identification procedures can take days and have a large false negative error. The method described in this study takes advantage of hyperspectral confocal fluorescence microscopy, which enables the capability to quickly and accurately identify and characterize the unique autofluorescence spectra from different Candida species with up to 84% accuracy when grown in conditions that closely mimic physiological conditions.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2]
  1. Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Pathology
  2. Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Bioenergy and Defense Technologies
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA); National Inst. of Health (NIH) (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
1325158
Report Number(s):
SAND-2016-4801J
Journal ID: ISSN 1083-3668; 640595
Grant/Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000; AI007538; P50GM085273; R01AI116894; 1-DP2-OD006673-01
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Biomedical Optics
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 22; Journal Issue: 1; Journal ID: ISSN 1083-3668
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; Candida albicans; Candida glabrata; Candida parapsilosis; autofluorescence; spectral analysis

Citation Formats

Graus, Matthew S., Neumann, Aaron K., and Timlin, Jerilyn A. Hyperspectral fluorescence microscopy detects autofluorescent factors that can be exploited as a diagnostic method for Candida species differentiation. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1117/1.JBO.22.1.016002.
Graus, Matthew S., Neumann, Aaron K., & Timlin, Jerilyn A. Hyperspectral fluorescence microscopy detects autofluorescent factors that can be exploited as a diagnostic method for Candida species differentiation. United States. doi:10.1117/1.JBO.22.1.016002.
Graus, Matthew S., Neumann, Aaron K., and Timlin, Jerilyn A. Thu . "Hyperspectral fluorescence microscopy detects autofluorescent factors that can be exploited as a diagnostic method for Candida species differentiation". United States. doi:10.1117/1.JBO.22.1.016002. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1325158.
@article{osti_1325158,
title = {Hyperspectral fluorescence microscopy detects autofluorescent factors that can be exploited as a diagnostic method for Candida species differentiation},
author = {Graus, Matthew S. and Neumann, Aaron K. and Timlin, Jerilyn A.},
abstractNote = {Fungi in the Candida genus are the most common fungal pathogens. They not only cause high morbidity and mortality but can also cost billions of dollars in healthcare. To alleviate this burden, early and accurate identification of Candida species is necessary. However, standard identification procedures can take days and have a large false negative error. The method described in this study takes advantage of hyperspectral confocal fluorescence microscopy, which enables the capability to quickly and accurately identify and characterize the unique autofluorescence spectra from different Candida species with up to 84% accuracy when grown in conditions that closely mimic physiological conditions.},
doi = {10.1117/1.JBO.22.1.016002},
journal = {Journal of Biomedical Optics},
number = 1,
volume = 22,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jan 05 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Thu Jan 05 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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