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Title: Energy Storage Opportunities and Capabilities in a Type 3 Wind Turbine Generator: Preprint

Abstract

Wind power plants and other renewable power plants with power electronic interfaces are capable of delivering frequency response (both governor and/or inertial response) to the grid by a control action; thus, the reduction of available online inertia as conventional power plants are retired can be compensated by designing renewable power plant controls to include frequency response. The source of energy to be delivered as inertial response is determined by the type of generation and control strategy chosen. The cost of energy storage is expected to drop over time, and global research activities on energy storage are very active, funded both by the private industry and governments. Different industry sectors (e.g., transportation, energy) are the major drivers of the recent storage research and development. This work investigates the opportunities and capabilities of deploying energy storage in renewable power plants. In particular, we focus on wind power plants with doubly-fed induction generators, or Type 3 wind turbine generator (WTGs). We find that the total output power of a system with Type 3 WTGs with energy storage can deliver a power boost during inertial response that is up to 45% higher than one without energy storage without affecting the torque limit, thus enablingmore » an effective delivery of ancillary services to the grid.« less

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
1325068
Report Number(s):
NREL/CP-5D00-66394
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: To be presented at the 2016 IEEE Energy Conversion Congress and Exposition, 18-22 September 2016, Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
17 WIND ENERGY; 24 POWER TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION; adjustable speed; ancillary services; doubly-fed induction generator; energy storage; frequency response; variable speed; wind power plant; wind turbine

Citation Formats

Muljadi, Eduard, Gevorgian, Vahan, and Hoke, Andy. Energy Storage Opportunities and Capabilities in a Type 3 Wind Turbine Generator: Preprint. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1109/ECCE.2016.7855081.
Muljadi, Eduard, Gevorgian, Vahan, & Hoke, Andy. Energy Storage Opportunities and Capabilities in a Type 3 Wind Turbine Generator: Preprint. United States. doi:10.1109/ECCE.2016.7855081.
Muljadi, Eduard, Gevorgian, Vahan, and Hoke, Andy. Thu . "Energy Storage Opportunities and Capabilities in a Type 3 Wind Turbine Generator: Preprint". United States. doi:10.1109/ECCE.2016.7855081. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1325068.
@article{osti_1325068,
title = {Energy Storage Opportunities and Capabilities in a Type 3 Wind Turbine Generator: Preprint},
author = {Muljadi, Eduard and Gevorgian, Vahan and Hoke, Andy},
abstractNote = {Wind power plants and other renewable power plants with power electronic interfaces are capable of delivering frequency response (both governor and/or inertial response) to the grid by a control action; thus, the reduction of available online inertia as conventional power plants are retired can be compensated by designing renewable power plant controls to include frequency response. The source of energy to be delivered as inertial response is determined by the type of generation and control strategy chosen. The cost of energy storage is expected to drop over time, and global research activities on energy storage are very active, funded both by the private industry and governments. Different industry sectors (e.g., transportation, energy) are the major drivers of the recent storage research and development. This work investigates the opportunities and capabilities of deploying energy storage in renewable power plants. In particular, we focus on wind power plants with doubly-fed induction generators, or Type 3 wind turbine generator (WTGs). We find that the total output power of a system with Type 3 WTGs with energy storage can deliver a power boost during inertial response that is up to 45% higher than one without energy storage without affecting the torque limit, thus enabling an effective delivery of ancillary services to the grid.},
doi = {10.1109/ECCE.2016.7855081},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Thu Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}

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