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Title: Understanding Dynamic Model Validation of a Wind Turbine Generator and a Wind Power Plant: Preprint

Abstract

Regional reliability organizations require power plants to validate the dynamic models that represent them to ensure that power systems studies are performed to the best representation of the components installed. In the process of validating a wind power plant (WPP), one must be cognizant of the parameter settings of the wind turbine generators (WTGs) and the operational settings of the WPP. Validating the dynamic model of a WPP is required to be performed periodically. This is because the control parameters of the WTGs and the other supporting components within a WPP may be modified to comply with new grid codes or upgrades to the WTG controller with new capabilities developed by the turbine manufacturers or requested by the plant owners or operators. The diversity within a WPP affects the way we represent it in a model. Diversity within a WPP may be found in the way the WTGs are controlled, the wind resource, the layout of the WPP (electrical diversity), and the type of WTGs used. Each group of WTGs constitutes a significant portion of the output power of the WPP, and their unique and salient behaviors should be represented individually. The objective of this paper is to illustrate themore » process of dynamic model validations of WTGs and WPPs, the available data recorded that must be screened before it is used for the dynamic validations, and the assumptions made in the dynamic models of the WTG and WPP that must be understood. Without understanding the correct process, the validations may lead to the wrong representations of the WTG and WPP modeled.« less

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
1325062
Report Number(s):
NREL/CP-5D00-66392
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: To be presented at the 2016 IEEE Energy Conversion Congress and Exposition, 18-22 September 2016, Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
17 WIND ENERGY; 24 POWER TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION; dynamic model; electromagnetic transient; validation; wind power plant; wind turbine generator

Citation Formats

Muljadi, Eduard, Zhang, Ying Chen, Gevorgian, Vahan, and Kosterev, Dmitry. Understanding Dynamic Model Validation of a Wind Turbine Generator and a Wind Power Plant: Preprint. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1109/ECCE.2016.7855542.
Muljadi, Eduard, Zhang, Ying Chen, Gevorgian, Vahan, & Kosterev, Dmitry. Understanding Dynamic Model Validation of a Wind Turbine Generator and a Wind Power Plant: Preprint. United States. doi:10.1109/ECCE.2016.7855542.
Muljadi, Eduard, Zhang, Ying Chen, Gevorgian, Vahan, and Kosterev, Dmitry. 2016. "Understanding Dynamic Model Validation of a Wind Turbine Generator and a Wind Power Plant: Preprint". United States. doi:10.1109/ECCE.2016.7855542. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1325062.
@article{osti_1325062,
title = {Understanding Dynamic Model Validation of a Wind Turbine Generator and a Wind Power Plant: Preprint},
author = {Muljadi, Eduard and Zhang, Ying Chen and Gevorgian, Vahan and Kosterev, Dmitry},
abstractNote = {Regional reliability organizations require power plants to validate the dynamic models that represent them to ensure that power systems studies are performed to the best representation of the components installed. In the process of validating a wind power plant (WPP), one must be cognizant of the parameter settings of the wind turbine generators (WTGs) and the operational settings of the WPP. Validating the dynamic model of a WPP is required to be performed periodically. This is because the control parameters of the WTGs and the other supporting components within a WPP may be modified to comply with new grid codes or upgrades to the WTG controller with new capabilities developed by the turbine manufacturers or requested by the plant owners or operators. The diversity within a WPP affects the way we represent it in a model. Diversity within a WPP may be found in the way the WTGs are controlled, the wind resource, the layout of the WPP (electrical diversity), and the type of WTGs used. Each group of WTGs constitutes a significant portion of the output power of the WPP, and their unique and salient behaviors should be represented individually. The objective of this paper is to illustrate the process of dynamic model validations of WTGs and WPPs, the available data recorded that must be screened before it is used for the dynamic validations, and the assumptions made in the dynamic models of the WTG and WPP that must be understood. Without understanding the correct process, the validations may lead to the wrong representations of the WTG and WPP modeled.},
doi = {10.1109/ECCE.2016.7855542},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}

Conference:
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