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Title: Castable Cement Can Prevent Molten-Salt Corrosion in CSP

Abstract

NREL's study demonstrated that castable cements on metals are a protective barrier that can prevent permeation of molten salts toward metallic surfaces. The silica-based castable cement Aremco 645-N, when sprayed with boron nitride, can protect containment metallic alloys from attack by molten chlorides at high temperatures (650 degrees C) in short-term tests. Improved thermal energy storage technology could increase the performance of CSP and reduce costs, helping to reach the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's SunShot Initiative to make solar cost-competitive with other non-renewable sources of electricity by 2020.

Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Communications and Outreach
OSTI Identifier:
1324954
Report Number(s):
NREL/FS-5500-67037
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; castable cement; concentrating solar power; CSP; molten salts

Citation Formats

. Castable Cement Can Prevent Molten-Salt Corrosion in CSP. United States: N. p., 2016. Web.
. Castable Cement Can Prevent Molten-Salt Corrosion in CSP. United States.
. Thu . "Castable Cement Can Prevent Molten-Salt Corrosion in CSP". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1324954.
@article{osti_1324954,
title = {Castable Cement Can Prevent Molten-Salt Corrosion in CSP},
author = {},
abstractNote = {NREL's study demonstrated that castable cements on metals are a protective barrier that can prevent permeation of molten salts toward metallic surfaces. The silica-based castable cement Aremco 645-N, when sprayed with boron nitride, can protect containment metallic alloys from attack by molten chlorides at high temperatures (650 degrees C) in short-term tests. Improved thermal energy storage technology could increase the performance of CSP and reduce costs, helping to reach the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's SunShot Initiative to make solar cost-competitive with other non-renewable sources of electricity by 2020.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Thu Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}
  • Castable cements on metals form a protective barrier that is able to prevent permeation of molten salts towards metallic surfaces. Silica-based castable cements are capable of protecting containment metallic alloys from the corrosive attack of molten chlorides at temperatures as high as 650 °C. Boron nitride (BN) blocking the pores in the cured cement prevents permeation of the molten chloride towards the metal surface. The cements tested are not chemically stable in molten carbonates, because the bonding components dissolved into molten carbonates salt. The corrosion rate is 7.72±0.32 mm/year for bare stainless steel 347 in molten eutectic NaCl – 65.58more » wt% LiCl at 650 °C, which is the baseline used for determining how well the cement protects the metallic surfaces from corrosion. In particular the metal fully encapsulated with Aremco 645-N with pores filled with boron nitride immersed in molten eutectic NaCl – 65.58 wt% LiCl at 650 °C shows a corrosion rate of 9E-04 mm/year. Here, the present study gives initial corrosion rates. Long-term tests are required to determine if Aremco 645-N with BN coating on metal has long term chemical stability for blocking salt permeation through coating pores.« less
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