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Title: Potential chemical impacts of CO 2 leakage on underground source of drinking water assessed by quantitative risk analysis

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ORCiD logo;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1324868
Grant/Contract Number:
FC26-05NT42591
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 50; Journal Issue: C; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-04 09:55:43; Journal ID: ISSN 1750-5836
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
Netherlands
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Xiao, Ting, McPherson, Brian, Pan, Feng, Esser, Rich, Jia, Wei, Bordelon, Amanda, and Bacon, Diana. Potential chemical impacts of CO 2 leakage on underground source of drinking water assessed by quantitative risk analysis. Netherlands: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1016/j.ijggc.2016.04.009.
Xiao, Ting, McPherson, Brian, Pan, Feng, Esser, Rich, Jia, Wei, Bordelon, Amanda, & Bacon, Diana. Potential chemical impacts of CO 2 leakage on underground source of drinking water assessed by quantitative risk analysis. Netherlands. doi:10.1016/j.ijggc.2016.04.009.
Xiao, Ting, McPherson, Brian, Pan, Feng, Esser, Rich, Jia, Wei, Bordelon, Amanda, and Bacon, Diana. 2016. "Potential chemical impacts of CO 2 leakage on underground source of drinking water assessed by quantitative risk analysis". Netherlands. doi:10.1016/j.ijggc.2016.04.009.
@article{osti_1324868,
title = {Potential chemical impacts of CO 2 leakage on underground source of drinking water assessed by quantitative risk analysis},
author = {Xiao, Ting and McPherson, Brian and Pan, Feng and Esser, Rich and Jia, Wei and Bordelon, Amanda and Bacon, Diana},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.ijggc.2016.04.009},
journal = {International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control},
number = C,
volume = 50,
place = {Netherlands},
year = 2016,
month = 7
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1016/j.ijggc.2016.04.009

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 8works
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

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