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Title: Role of Water During Crystallization of Amorphous Cobalt Phosphate Nanoparticles

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1324797
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Crystal Growth and Design; Journal Volume: 16; Journal Issue: 8
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH

Citation Formats

Bach, Sven, Panthöfer, Martin, Bienert, Ralf, Buzanich, Ana de Oliveira Guilherme, Emmerling, Franziska, and Tremel, Wolfgang. Role of Water During Crystallization of Amorphous Cobalt Phosphate Nanoparticles. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1021/acs.cgd.6b00208.
Bach, Sven, Panthöfer, Martin, Bienert, Ralf, Buzanich, Ana de Oliveira Guilherme, Emmerling, Franziska, & Tremel, Wolfgang. Role of Water During Crystallization of Amorphous Cobalt Phosphate Nanoparticles. United States. doi:10.1021/acs.cgd.6b00208.
Bach, Sven, Panthöfer, Martin, Bienert, Ralf, Buzanich, Ana de Oliveira Guilherme, Emmerling, Franziska, and Tremel, Wolfgang. Wed . "Role of Water During Crystallization of Amorphous Cobalt Phosphate Nanoparticles". United States. doi:10.1021/acs.cgd.6b00208.
@article{osti_1324797,
title = {Role of Water During Crystallization of Amorphous Cobalt Phosphate Nanoparticles},
author = {Bach, Sven and Panthöfer, Martin and Bienert, Ralf and Buzanich, Ana de Oliveira Guilherme and Emmerling, Franziska and Tremel, Wolfgang},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1021/acs.cgd.6b00208},
journal = {Crystal Growth and Design},
number = 8,
volume = 16,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Aug 03 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Wed Aug 03 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}
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  • The crystallization kinetics of nanoscale amorphous solid water (ASW) films are investigated using temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS). TPD measurements are used to probe surface crystallization and RAIRS measurements are used to probe bulk crystallization. Isothermal TPD results show that surface crystallization is independent of the film thickness (from 100 to 1000 ML). Conversely, the RAIRS measurements show that the bulk crystallization time increases linearly with increasing film thickness. These results suggest that nucleation and crystallization begin at the ASW/vacuum interface and then the crystallization growth front propagates linearly into the bulk. This mechanism was confirmedmore » by selective placement of an isotopic layer (5% D2O in H2O) at various positions in an ASW (H2O) film. In this case, the closer the isotopic layer was to the vacuum interface, the earlier the isotopic layer crystallized. These experiments provide direct evidence to confirm that ASW crystallization in vacuum proceeds by a “top-down” crystallization mechanism.« less
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