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Title: The molecular mechanisms of allosteric mutations impairing MepR repressor function in multidrug-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. VA
  2. (
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS)
Sponsoring Org.:
OTHER U.S. GOVERNMENTUNIVERSITY
OSTI Identifier:
1324771
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: mBio (Online); Journal Volume: 4; Journal Issue: 5
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH

Citation Formats

Birukou, Ivan, Tonthat, Nam K., Seo, Susan M., Schindler, Bryan D., Kaatz, Glenn W., Brennan, Richard G., and Duke-MED). The molecular mechanisms of allosteric mutations impairing MepR repressor function in multidrug-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus.. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1128/mBio.00528-13.
Birukou, Ivan, Tonthat, Nam K., Seo, Susan M., Schindler, Bryan D., Kaatz, Glenn W., Brennan, Richard G., & Duke-MED). The molecular mechanisms of allosteric mutations impairing MepR repressor function in multidrug-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus.. United States. doi:10.1128/mBio.00528-13.
Birukou, Ivan, Tonthat, Nam K., Seo, Susan M., Schindler, Bryan D., Kaatz, Glenn W., Brennan, Richard G., and Duke-MED). 2016. "The molecular mechanisms of allosteric mutations impairing MepR repressor function in multidrug-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus.". United States. doi:10.1128/mBio.00528-13.
@article{osti_1324771,
title = {The molecular mechanisms of allosteric mutations impairing MepR repressor function in multidrug-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus.},
author = {Birukou, Ivan and Tonthat, Nam K. and Seo, Susan M. and Schindler, Bryan D. and Kaatz, Glenn W. and Brennan, Richard G. and Duke-MED)},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1128/mBio.00528-13},
journal = {mBio (Online)},
number = 5,
volume = 4,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}
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