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Title: Experimental Studies of Engineered Barrier Systems Conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory (FY16)

Abstract

Over the past five years the Used Fuel Campaign has investigated Engineered Barrier Systems (EBS) at higher heat loads (up to 300°C) and pressure (150 bar). This past year experimental work was hindered due to a revamping of the hydrothermal lab. Regardless, two experiments were run this past year, EBS-18 and EBS-19. EBS-18 was run using Low Carbon Steel (LCS) and opalinus clay in addition to the bentonite and opalinus brine. Many of the past results were confirmed in EBS-18, such as the restriction of illite formation due to the bulk chemistry, pyrite degradation, and zeolite formation dependent on the bentonite and opalinus clay. The LCS show vast amounts of pit corrosion (over 100μm of corrosion in six weeks), leading a corrosion rate of 1083 μm/year. In addition, a mineral goethite, an iron-bearing hydroxide, formed in the pits of the LCS. Preliminary results from EBS-19 water chemistry are included but SEM imaging, micro probe and XRD are still needed for further results. Copper corrosion was investigated further and over 850 measurements were taken. It was concluded that pitting and pyrite degradation drastically increase the corrosion rate from 0.12 to 0.39 μm/day. However, the growth of a layer of the mineralmore » chalcocite is thought to subdue the corrosion rate to 0.024 μm/day as observed in the EBS-13, a sixth month experiment. This document presents the findings of this past year.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [3];  [4]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
  2. Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States). School of Geology and Geophysics; Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
  3. Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences; Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
  4. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE), Fuel Cycle Technologies (NE-5). Used Fuel Disposition Campaign
OSTI Identifier:
1324542
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-16-25834
TRN: US1700054
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; OPALINUS CLAY; BENTONITE; ILLITE; PYRITE; GOETHITE; ZEOLITES; PITTING CORROSION; WATER CHEMISTRY; ENGINEERED SAFETY SYSTEMS; COPPER; BRINES; SPENT FUELS; TEMPERATURE RANGE 0400-1000 K; PRESSURE RANGE MEGA PA 10-100; COPPER SULFIDES; LOW CARBON-HIGH ALLOY STEELS; RADIOACTIVE WASTE DISPOSAL; Earth Sciences

Citation Formats

Caporuscio, Florie Andre, Norskog, Katherine Elizabeth, Maner, James, Palaich, Sarah, and Cheshire, Michael C. Experimental Studies of Engineered Barrier Systems Conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory (FY16). United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1324542.
Caporuscio, Florie Andre, Norskog, Katherine Elizabeth, Maner, James, Palaich, Sarah, & Cheshire, Michael C. Experimental Studies of Engineered Barrier Systems Conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory (FY16). United States. doi:10.2172/1324542.
Caporuscio, Florie Andre, Norskog, Katherine Elizabeth, Maner, James, Palaich, Sarah, and Cheshire, Michael C. 2016. "Experimental Studies of Engineered Barrier Systems Conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory (FY16)". United States. doi:10.2172/1324542. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1324542.
@article{osti_1324542,
title = {Experimental Studies of Engineered Barrier Systems Conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory (FY16)},
author = {Caporuscio, Florie Andre and Norskog, Katherine Elizabeth and Maner, James and Palaich, Sarah and Cheshire, Michael C.},
abstractNote = {Over the past five years the Used Fuel Campaign has investigated Engineered Barrier Systems (EBS) at higher heat loads (up to 300°C) and pressure (150 bar). This past year experimental work was hindered due to a revamping of the hydrothermal lab. Regardless, two experiments were run this past year, EBS-18 and EBS-19. EBS-18 was run using Low Carbon Steel (LCS) and opalinus clay in addition to the bentonite and opalinus brine. Many of the past results were confirmed in EBS-18, such as the restriction of illite formation due to the bulk chemistry, pyrite degradation, and zeolite formation dependent on the bentonite and opalinus clay. The LCS show vast amounts of pit corrosion (over 100μm of corrosion in six weeks), leading a corrosion rate of 1083 μm/year. In addition, a mineral goethite, an iron-bearing hydroxide, formed in the pits of the LCS. Preliminary results from EBS-19 water chemistry are included but SEM imaging, micro probe and XRD are still needed for further results. Copper corrosion was investigated further and over 850 measurements were taken. It was concluded that pitting and pyrite degradation drastically increase the corrosion rate from 0.12 to 0.39 μm/day. However, the growth of a layer of the mineral chalcocite is thought to subdue the corrosion rate to 0.024 μm/day as observed in the EBS-13, a sixth month experiment. This document presents the findings of this past year.},
doi = {10.2172/1324542},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}

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