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Title: OpenStudio: A Platform for Ex Ante Incentive Programs

Abstract

Many utilities operate programs that provide ex ante (up front) incentives for building energy conservation measures (ECMs). A typical incentive program covers two kinds of ECMs. ECMs that deliver similar savings in different contexts are associated with pre-calculated 'deemed' savings values. ECMs that deliver different savings in different contexts are evaluated on a 'custom' per-project basis. Incentive programs often operate at less than peak efficiency because both deemed ECMs and custom projects have lengthy and effort-intensive review processes--deemed ECMs to gain confidence that they are sufficiently context insensitive, custom projects to ensure that savings are claimed appropriately. DOE's OpenStudio platform can be used to automate ex ante processes and help utilities operate programs more efficiently, consistently, and transparently, resulting in greater project throughput and energy savings. A key concept of the platform is the OpenStudio Measure, a script that queries and transforms building energy models. Measures can be simple or surgical, e.g., applying different transformations based on space-type, orientation, etc. Measures represent ECMs explicitly and are easier to review than ECMs that are represented implicitly as the difference between a with-ECM and without-ECM models. Measures can be automatically applied to large numbers of prototype models--and instantiated from uncertainty distributions--facilitating themore » large scale analysis required to develop deemed savings values. For custom projects, Measures can also be used to calibrate existing building models, to automatically create code baseline models, and to perform quality assurance screening.« less

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
1324396
Report Number(s):
NREL/CP-5500-67087
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Presented at the 2016 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings, 21-26 August 2016, Pacific Grove, California
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; building energy conservation measures; incentive programs; OpenStudio

Citation Formats

Roth, Amir, Brackney, Larry, Parker, Andrew, and Beitel, Annette. OpenStudio: A Platform for Ex Ante Incentive Programs. United States: N. p., 2016. Web.
Roth, Amir, Brackney, Larry, Parker, Andrew, & Beitel, Annette. OpenStudio: A Platform for Ex Ante Incentive Programs. United States.
Roth, Amir, Brackney, Larry, Parker, Andrew, and Beitel, Annette. 2016. "OpenStudio: A Platform for Ex Ante Incentive Programs". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_1324396,
title = {OpenStudio: A Platform for Ex Ante Incentive Programs},
author = {Roth, Amir and Brackney, Larry and Parker, Andrew and Beitel, Annette},
abstractNote = {Many utilities operate programs that provide ex ante (up front) incentives for building energy conservation measures (ECMs). A typical incentive program covers two kinds of ECMs. ECMs that deliver similar savings in different contexts are associated with pre-calculated 'deemed' savings values. ECMs that deliver different savings in different contexts are evaluated on a 'custom' per-project basis. Incentive programs often operate at less than peak efficiency because both deemed ECMs and custom projects have lengthy and effort-intensive review processes--deemed ECMs to gain confidence that they are sufficiently context insensitive, custom projects to ensure that savings are claimed appropriately. DOE's OpenStudio platform can be used to automate ex ante processes and help utilities operate programs more efficiently, consistently, and transparently, resulting in greater project throughput and energy savings. A key concept of the platform is the OpenStudio Measure, a script that queries and transforms building energy models. Measures can be simple or surgical, e.g., applying different transformations based on space-type, orientation, etc. Measures represent ECMs explicitly and are easier to review than ECMs that are represented implicitly as the difference between a with-ECM and without-ECM models. Measures can be automatically applied to large numbers of prototype models--and instantiated from uncertainty distributions--facilitating the large scale analysis required to develop deemed savings values. For custom projects, Measures can also be used to calibrate existing building models, to automatically create code baseline models, and to perform quality assurance screening.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}

Conference:
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