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Title: Ballistic effects on the copper precipitation and re-dissolution kinetics in an ion irradiated and thermally annealed Fe–Cu alloy

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5]
  1. Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996, USA, School of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon 97331, USA
  2. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352, USA
  3. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA
  4. Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA
  5. Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996, USA
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1324367
Grant/Contract Number:
FG02- 04GR54750; Office of Nuclear Energy, Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies, Reactor Materials program
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
The Journal of Chemical Physics
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 145; Journal Issue: 10; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2018-03-09 11:23:50; Journal ID: ISSN 0021-9606
Publisher:
American Institute of Physics
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Xu, Donghua, Certain, Alicia, Lee Voigt, Hyon-Jee, Allen, Todd, and Wirth, Brian D. Ballistic effects on the copper precipitation and re-dissolution kinetics in an ion irradiated and thermally annealed Fe–Cu alloy. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4962345.
Xu, Donghua, Certain, Alicia, Lee Voigt, Hyon-Jee, Allen, Todd, & Wirth, Brian D. Ballistic effects on the copper precipitation and re-dissolution kinetics in an ion irradiated and thermally annealed Fe–Cu alloy. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4962345.
Xu, Donghua, Certain, Alicia, Lee Voigt, Hyon-Jee, Allen, Todd, and Wirth, Brian D. Tue . "Ballistic effects on the copper precipitation and re-dissolution kinetics in an ion irradiated and thermally annealed Fe–Cu alloy". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4962345.
@article{osti_1324367,
title = {Ballistic effects on the copper precipitation and re-dissolution kinetics in an ion irradiated and thermally annealed Fe–Cu alloy},
author = {Xu, Donghua and Certain, Alicia and Lee Voigt, Hyon-Jee and Allen, Todd and Wirth, Brian D.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1063/1.4962345},
journal = {The Journal of Chemical Physics},
number = 10,
volume = 145,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Sep 13 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Tue Sep 13 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1063/1.4962345

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 1work
Citation information provided by
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