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Title: Revisiting formic acid decomposition on metallic powder catalysts: Exploding the HCOOH decomposition volcano curve

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1324336
Grant/Contract Number:
FG02-93ER14350
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Surface Science
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 650; Journal Issue: C; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-03 21:32:35; Journal ID: ISSN 0039-6028
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
Netherlands
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Tang, Yadan, Roberts, Charles A., Perkins, Ryan T., and Wachs, Israel E.. Revisiting formic acid decomposition on metallic powder catalysts: Exploding the HCOOH decomposition volcano curve. Netherlands: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1016/j.susc.2015.12.032.
Tang, Yadan, Roberts, Charles A., Perkins, Ryan T., & Wachs, Israel E.. Revisiting formic acid decomposition on metallic powder catalysts: Exploding the HCOOH decomposition volcano curve. Netherlands. doi:10.1016/j.susc.2015.12.032.
Tang, Yadan, Roberts, Charles A., Perkins, Ryan T., and Wachs, Israel E.. 2016. "Revisiting formic acid decomposition on metallic powder catalysts: Exploding the HCOOH decomposition volcano curve". Netherlands. doi:10.1016/j.susc.2015.12.032.
@article{osti_1324336,
title = {Revisiting formic acid decomposition on metallic powder catalysts: Exploding the HCOOH decomposition volcano curve},
author = {Tang, Yadan and Roberts, Charles A. and Perkins, Ryan T. and Wachs, Israel E.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.susc.2015.12.032},
journal = {Surface Science},
number = C,
volume = 650,
place = {Netherlands},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1016/j.susc.2015.12.032

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 3works
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

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  • Turnover rates for the catalytic dehydrogenation of formic acid (HCOOH) on copper/silica (Cu/SiO/sub 2/)(Cu/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/) and Cu powder between 380 and 500K are reported. The turnover rate is independent of HCOOH partial pressure between 1.5 and 6 kPa, concentration of decomposition products, metal loading (0.33-19.2%), metal dispersion (0.03-22%), and the nature of the support. HCOOH adsorption on Cu at room temperature leads to the formation of surface formate. Its decomposition rate constant agrees with that reported for the catalytic decomposition of HCOOH on Cu, and the decomposition of HCOOH preadsorbed on Cu(110) at low coverage. 5 figures, 3 tables.
  • Following measurements in the winter of 2012, formic acid (HCOOH) and nitric acid (HNO 3) were measured using a chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS) during the Summer Clean Air for London (ClearfLo) campaign in London, 2012. Consequently, the seasonal dependence of formic acid sources could be better understood. A mean formic acid concentration of 1.3 ppb and a maximum of 12.7 ppb was measured which is significantly greater than that measured during the winter campaign (0.63 ppb and 6.7 ppb, respectively). Daily calibrations of formic acid during the summer campaign gave sensitivities of 1.2 ion counts s -1 parts permore » trillion (ppt) by volume -1 and a limit of detection of 34 ppt. During the summer campaign, there was no correlation between formic acid and anthropogenic emissions such as NO x and CO or peaks associated with the rush hour as was identified in the winter. Rather, peaks in formic acid were observed that correlated with solar irradiance. Analysis using a photochemical trajectory model has been conducted to determine the source of this formic acid. The contribution of formic acid formation through ozonolysis of alkenes is important but the secondary production from biogenic VOCs could be the most dominant source of formic acid at this measurement site during the summer.« less
  • Following measurements in the winter of 2012, formic acid (HCOOH) and nitric acid (HNO 3) were measured using a chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS) during the Summer Clean Air for London (ClearfLo) campaign in London, 2012. Consequently, the seasonal dependence of formic acid sources could be better understood. A mean formic acid concentration of 1.3 ppb and a maximum of 12.7 ppb was measured which is significantly greater than that measured during the winter campaign (0.63 ppb and 6.7 ppb, respectively). Daily calibrations of formic acid during the summer campaign gave sensitivities of 1.2 ion counts s -1 parts permore » trillion (ppt) by volume -1 and a limit of detection of 34 ppt. During the summer campaign, there was no correlation between formic acid and anthropogenic emissions such as NO x and CO or peaks associated with the rush hour as was identified in the winter. Rather, peaks in formic acid were observed that correlated with solar irradiance. Analysis using a photochemical trajectory model has been conducted to determine the source of this formic acid. The contribution of formic acid formation through ozonolysis of alkenes is important but the secondary production from biogenic VOCs could be the most dominant source of formic acid at this measurement site during the summer.« less