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Title: Informing a Tidal Turbine Strike Probability Model through Characterization of Fish Behavioral Response using Multibeam Sonar Output

Abstract

One of the most important biological questions facing the marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy industry is whether fish and marine mammals that encounter MHK devices are likely to be struck by moving components. For hydrokinetic (HK) devices, i.e., those that generate energy from flowing water, this concern is greatest for large organisms because their increased length increases the probability that they will be struck as they pass through the area of blade sweep and because their increased mass means that the force absorbed if struck is greater and potentially more damaging (Amaral et al. 2015). Key to answering this question is understanding whether aquatic organisms change their swimming behavior as they encounter a device in a way that decreases their likelihood of being struck and possibly injured by the device. Whether near-field or far-field behavior results in general avoidance of or attraction to HK devices is a significant factor in the possible risk of physical contact with rotating turbine blades (Cada and Bevelhimer 2011).

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2];  [3];  [1]
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Division
  2. Verdant Power, Inc., New York, NY (United States)
  3. Kleinschmidt Associates, Pittsfield, ME (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Verdant Power, Inc., New York, NY (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Wind and Water Technologies Office (EE-4W); Verdant Power, Inc. (United States); New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
1324172
Report Number(s):
ORNL/TM-2016/219
WC0102000; CEWW099
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
13 HYDRO ENERGY; 60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; Marine energy; hydroacoustics; fish behavior; turbine encounter

Citation Formats

Bevelhimer, Mark S., Colby, Jonathan, Adonizio, Mary Ann, Tomichek, Christine, and Scherelis, Constantin C. Informing a Tidal Turbine Strike Probability Model through Characterization of Fish Behavioral Response using Multibeam Sonar Output. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1324172.
Bevelhimer, Mark S., Colby, Jonathan, Adonizio, Mary Ann, Tomichek, Christine, & Scherelis, Constantin C. Informing a Tidal Turbine Strike Probability Model through Characterization of Fish Behavioral Response using Multibeam Sonar Output. United States. doi:10.2172/1324172.
Bevelhimer, Mark S., Colby, Jonathan, Adonizio, Mary Ann, Tomichek, Christine, and Scherelis, Constantin C. 2016. "Informing a Tidal Turbine Strike Probability Model through Characterization of Fish Behavioral Response using Multibeam Sonar Output". United States. doi:10.2172/1324172. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1324172.
@article{osti_1324172,
title = {Informing a Tidal Turbine Strike Probability Model through Characterization of Fish Behavioral Response using Multibeam Sonar Output},
author = {Bevelhimer, Mark S. and Colby, Jonathan and Adonizio, Mary Ann and Tomichek, Christine and Scherelis, Constantin C.},
abstractNote = {One of the most important biological questions facing the marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy industry is whether fish and marine mammals that encounter MHK devices are likely to be struck by moving components. For hydrokinetic (HK) devices, i.e., those that generate energy from flowing water, this concern is greatest for large organisms because their increased length increases the probability that they will be struck as they pass through the area of blade sweep and because their increased mass means that the force absorbed if struck is greater and potentially more damaging (Amaral et al. 2015). Key to answering this question is understanding whether aquatic organisms change their swimming behavior as they encounter a device in a way that decreases their likelihood of being struck and possibly injured by the device. Whether near-field or far-field behavior results in general avoidance of or attraction to HK devices is a significant factor in the possible risk of physical contact with rotating turbine blades (Cada and Bevelhimer 2011).},
doi = {10.2172/1324172},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 7
}

Technical Report:

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