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Title: Spin-current probe for phase transition in an insulator

Abstract

Spin fluctuation and transition have always been one of the central topics of magnetism and condensed matter science. Experimentally, the spin fluctuation is found transcribed onto scattering intensity in the neutron-scattering process, which is represented by dynamical magnetic susceptibility and maximized at phase transitions. Importantly, a neutron carries spin without electric charge, and therefore it can bring spin into a sample without being disturbed by electric energy. However, large facilities such as a nuclear reactor are necessary. Here we present that spin pumping, frequently used in nanoscale spintronic devices, provides a desktop microprobe for spin transition; spin current is a flux of spin without an electric charge and its transport reflects spin excitation. Additionally, we demonstrate detection of antiferromagnetic transition in ultra-thin CoO films via frequency-dependent spin-current transmission measurements, which provides a versatile probe for phase transition in an electric manner in minute devices.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1];  [3];  [3];  [2];  [4];  [5];  [6];  [7];  [2];  [8]
  1. Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). WPI-Advanced Inst. for Materials Research; Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Sendai (Japan)
  2. Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)
  3. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Advanced Light Source (ALS)
  4. Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Saitama (Japan)
  5. Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). WPI-Advanced Inst. for Materials Research
  6. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
  7. Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)
  8. Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Saitama (Japan); Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Tokai (Japan)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22); National Science Foundation (NSF); National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF)
OSTI Identifier:
1324107
Grant/Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725; AC02-05CH11231; SC0012190
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Nature Communications
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 7; Journal ID: ISSN 2041-1723
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE

Citation Formats

Qiu, Zhiyong, Li, Jia, Hou, Dazhi, Arenholz, Elke, N’Diaye, Alpha T., Tan, Ali, Uchida, Ken-ichi, Sato, Koji, Okamoto, Satoshi, Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav, Qiu, Z. Q., and Saitoh, Eiji. Spin-current probe for phase transition in an insulator. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1038/ncomms12670.
Qiu, Zhiyong, Li, Jia, Hou, Dazhi, Arenholz, Elke, N’Diaye, Alpha T., Tan, Ali, Uchida, Ken-ichi, Sato, Koji, Okamoto, Satoshi, Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav, Qiu, Z. Q., & Saitoh, Eiji. Spin-current probe for phase transition in an insulator. United States. doi:10.1038/ncomms12670.
Qiu, Zhiyong, Li, Jia, Hou, Dazhi, Arenholz, Elke, N’Diaye, Alpha T., Tan, Ali, Uchida, Ken-ichi, Sato, Koji, Okamoto, Satoshi, Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav, Qiu, Z. Q., and Saitoh, Eiji. 2016. "Spin-current probe for phase transition in an insulator". United States. doi:10.1038/ncomms12670. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1324107.
@article{osti_1324107,
title = {Spin-current probe for phase transition in an insulator},
author = {Qiu, Zhiyong and Li, Jia and Hou, Dazhi and Arenholz, Elke and N’Diaye, Alpha T. and Tan, Ali and Uchida, Ken-ichi and Sato, Koji and Okamoto, Satoshi and Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav and Qiu, Z. Q. and Saitoh, Eiji},
abstractNote = {Spin fluctuation and transition have always been one of the central topics of magnetism and condensed matter science. Experimentally, the spin fluctuation is found transcribed onto scattering intensity in the neutron-scattering process, which is represented by dynamical magnetic susceptibility and maximized at phase transitions. Importantly, a neutron carries spin without electric charge, and therefore it can bring spin into a sample without being disturbed by electric energy. However, large facilities such as a nuclear reactor are necessary. Here we present that spin pumping, frequently used in nanoscale spintronic devices, provides a desktop microprobe for spin transition; spin current is a flux of spin without an electric charge and its transport reflects spin excitation. Additionally, we demonstrate detection of antiferromagnetic transition in ultra-thin CoO films via frequency-dependent spin-current transmission measurements, which provides a versatile probe for phase transition in an electric manner in minute devices.},
doi = {10.1038/ncomms12670},
journal = {Nature Communications},
number = ,
volume = 7,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 9works
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  • Spin fluctuation and transition have always been one of the central topics of magnetism and condensed matter science. Experimentally, the spin fluctuation is found transcribed onto scattering intensity in the neutron-scattering process, which is represented by dynamical magnetic susceptibility and maximized at phase transitions. Importantly, a neutron carries spin without electric charge, and therefore it can bring spin into a sample without being disturbed by electric energy. However, large facilities such as a nuclear reactor are necessary. Here we show that spin pumping, frequently used in nanoscale spintronic devices, provides a desktop microprobe for spin transition; spin current is amore » flux of spin without an electric charge and its transport reflects spin excitation. We demonstrate detection of antiferromagnetic transition in ultra-thin CoO films via frequency-dependent spin-current transmission measurements, which provides a versatile probe for phase transition in an electric manner in minute devices.« less
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