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Title: Pushing the size limit of de novo structure ensemble prediction guided by sparse SDSL-EPR restraints to 200 residues: The monomeric and homodimeric forms of BAX

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1323959
Grant/Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Structural Biology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 195; Journal Issue: 1; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-06 09:49:31; Journal ID: ISSN 1047-8477
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Fischer, Axel W., Bordignon, Enrica, Bleicken, Stephanie, García-Sáez, Ana J., Jeschke, Gunnar, and Meiler, Jens. Pushing the size limit of de novo structure ensemble prediction guided by sparse SDSL-EPR restraints to 200 residues: The monomeric and homodimeric forms of BAX. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1016/j.jsb.2016.04.014.
Fischer, Axel W., Bordignon, Enrica, Bleicken, Stephanie, García-Sáez, Ana J., Jeschke, Gunnar, & Meiler, Jens. Pushing the size limit of de novo structure ensemble prediction guided by sparse SDSL-EPR restraints to 200 residues: The monomeric and homodimeric forms of BAX. United States. doi:10.1016/j.jsb.2016.04.014.
Fischer, Axel W., Bordignon, Enrica, Bleicken, Stephanie, García-Sáez, Ana J., Jeschke, Gunnar, and Meiler, Jens. 2016. "Pushing the size limit of de novo structure ensemble prediction guided by sparse SDSL-EPR restraints to 200 residues: The monomeric and homodimeric forms of BAX". United States. doi:10.1016/j.jsb.2016.04.014.
@article{osti_1323959,
title = {Pushing the size limit of de novo structure ensemble prediction guided by sparse SDSL-EPR restraints to 200 residues: The monomeric and homodimeric forms of BAX},
author = {Fischer, Axel W. and Bordignon, Enrica and Bleicken, Stephanie and García-Sáez, Ana J. and Jeschke, Gunnar and Meiler, Jens},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.jsb.2016.04.014},
journal = {Journal of Structural Biology},
number = 1,
volume = 195,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 7
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1016/j.jsb.2016.04.014

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 1work
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

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