skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Using the Spatial Distribution of Installers to Define Solar Photovoltaic Markets

Abstract

Solar PV market research to date has largely relied on arbitrary jurisdictional boundaries, such as counties, to study solar PV market dynamics. This paper seeks to improve solar PV market research by developing a methodology to define solar PV markets. The methodology is based on the spatial distribution of solar PV installers. An algorithm is developed and applied to a rich dataset of solar PV installations to study the outcomes of the installer-based market definitions. The installer-based approach exhibits several desirable properties. Specifically, the higher market granularity of the installer-based approach will allow future PV market research to study the relationship between market dynamics and pricing with more precision.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
  2. Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)
  3. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Solar Energy Technologies Office (EE-4S)
OSTI Identifier:
1322906
Report Number(s):
NREL/TP-6A20-66773
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY, AND ECONOMY; 14 SOLAR ENERGY; soft costs; solar soft costs; balance of system; solar balance of system; PV; market research; spatial distribution; PV installations

Citation Formats

O'Shaughnessy, Eric, Nemet, Gregory F., and Darghouth, Naim. Using the Spatial Distribution of Installers to Define Solar Photovoltaic Markets. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1322906.
O'Shaughnessy, Eric, Nemet, Gregory F., & Darghouth, Naim. Using the Spatial Distribution of Installers to Define Solar Photovoltaic Markets. United States. doi:10.2172/1322906.
O'Shaughnessy, Eric, Nemet, Gregory F., and Darghouth, Naim. 2016. "Using the Spatial Distribution of Installers to Define Solar Photovoltaic Markets". United States. doi:10.2172/1322906. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1322906.
@article{osti_1322906,
title = {Using the Spatial Distribution of Installers to Define Solar Photovoltaic Markets},
author = {O'Shaughnessy, Eric and Nemet, Gregory F. and Darghouth, Naim},
abstractNote = {Solar PV market research to date has largely relied on arbitrary jurisdictional boundaries, such as counties, to study solar PV market dynamics. This paper seeks to improve solar PV market research by developing a methodology to define solar PV markets. The methodology is based on the spatial distribution of solar PV installers. An algorithm is developed and applied to a rich dataset of solar PV installations to study the outcomes of the installer-based market definitions. The installer-based approach exhibits several desirable properties. Specifically, the higher market granularity of the installer-based approach will allow future PV market research to study the relationship between market dynamics and pricing with more precision.},
doi = {10.2172/1322906},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}

Technical Report:

Save / Share:
  • This is a letter report to Fluor Hanford, Inc. The purpose of this report is to summarize state-of-the-art, minimally intrusive geophysical techniques that can be used to clarify subsurface geology, structure, moisture, and chemical composition. The technology review focused on geophysical characterization techniques that provide two- or three-dimensional information about the spatial distribution of subsurface properties and/or contaminants.
  • Findings are based on interviews with executives in the photovoltaics industry, research and planning directors of leading electric utilities in solar energy applications, and Federal officials. There are three major conclusions of the study: (1) Photovoltaics is a family of technologies. The industry foresees at least two or three overlapping generations of the technology. There are likely to be multiple technology winners in a mature commercial market. There will be sharp reductions in cost and prices in the near term, but the industry does not expect module prices to be reduced to 50 cents/Wp by 1986, as targeted by DOEmore » goals. The present DOE goal structure may be incomplete since nonarray costs will be an increasing percentage of total system costs, and since the emerging technologies may have differing system configurations and cost requirements. (2) The market outlook is not favorable for major corporate investment. Photovoltaic technology is not likely to contribute significantly to US energy supplies until the 21st century, although some penetration of grid-connected or grid-displacing installations will likely occur through the 1990's. (3) Technical talent and corporate resources are currently being underutilized by the Federal program. The industry does not have confidence in the government's long-term commitment to photovoltaics. Recent government interest in rapid commercialization is viewed by a large segment of the industry as government impatience with the necessarily lengthy technology and market development process. It is not clear that competitive advantages can be established by individual companies within the framework of the DOE program. (WHK)« less
  • Structural Considerations for Solar Installers provides a comprehensive outline of structural considerations associated with simplified solar installations and recommends a set of best practices installers can follow when assessing such considerations. Information in the manual comes from engineering and solar experts as well as case studies. The objectives of the manual are to ensure safety and structural durability for rooftop solar installations and to potentially accelerate the permitting process by identifying and remedying structural issues prior to installation. The purpose of this document is to provide tools and guidelines for installers to help ensure that residential photovoltaic (PV) power systemsmore » are properly specified and installed with respect to the continuing structural integrity of the building.« less
  • Information regarding generic type, make, and costs of solar domestic water heater (SDWH) systems in the Sacramento, Roseville, and Davis area is reported. Sixteen SDWH installers/do-it-yourself kit dealers were identified and surveyed by phone. The survey participants were divided into three categories: (1) installers in business for one year or longer, (eight firms); (2) installers in business less than one year, (five firms); and (3) SDWH do-it-yourself kit dealers, (three firms). The survey report establishes an average cost for SDWH pump systems for new single family unit production housing (1350 square feet), with hot water demand typical of an averagemore » family of four, and roof mounted collectors. For the first two categories, the SDWH system average cost is $2469 (this includes both open loop and heat exchanger systems with circulating pumps). The average cost of the open loop pump system is $2321; whereas, the heat exchanger pump system average cost is $2592. The participants were questioned concerning discounts they would offer to builders purchasing SDWH's in volume. From their responses, an 11% discount for a purchase of ten systems was derived for the first two installers categories. The average cost of an installed SDWH pump system purchased in a volume of ten units is $2201. The average cost of an installed SDWH open loop system is $2066, and a heat exchanger system is $2307. For the third category, the do-it-yourself kit dealers, a 12% discount was derived for a purchase of ten systems. The average cost of a do-it-yourself pump kit when purchased in a volume of ten units is $1481. The average cost of an open loop pump kit is $1386, and a heat exchanger pump kit is $1672.« less