skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Simulation of Subsurface Multiphase Contaminant Extraction Using a Bioslurping Well Model

Abstract

Subsurface simulation of multiphase extraction from wells is notoriously difficult. Explicit representation of well geometry requires small grid resolution, potentially leading to large computational demands. To reduce the problem dimensionality, multiphase extraction is mostly modeled using vertically-averaged approaches. In this paper, a multiphase well model approach is presented as an alternative to simplify the application. The well model, a multiphase extension of the classic Peaceman model, has been implemented in the STOMP simulator. The numerical solution approach accounts for local conditions and gradients in the exchange of fluids between the well and the aquifer. Advantages of this well model implementation include the option to simulate the effects of well characteristics and operation. Simulations were conducted investigating the effects of extraction location, applied vacuum pressure, and a number of hydraulic properties. The obtained results were all consistent and logical. A major outcome of the test simulations is that, in contrast with common recommendations to extract from either the gas-NAPL or the NAPL-aqueous phase interface, the optimum extraction location should be in between these two levels. The new model implementation was also used to simulate extraction at a field site in Brazil. The simulation shows a good match with the field data,more » suggesting that the new STOMP well module may correctly represent oil removal. The field simulations depend on the quality of the site conceptual model, including the porous media and contaminant properties and the boundary and extraction conditions adopted. The new module may potentially be used to design field applications and analyze extraction data.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ORCiD logo
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (US), Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1322504
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-119320
Journal ID: ISSN 0169-3913; 48503; KP1704020
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Transport in Porous Media; Journal Volume: 114; Journal Issue: 3
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
well model; bioslurping; STOMP; multiphase extraction; Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory

Citation Formats

Matos de Souza, Michelle, Oostrom, Mart, White, Mark D., Cardoso da Silva, Gerson, and Barbosa, Maria Claudia. Simulation of Subsurface Multiphase Contaminant Extraction Using a Bioslurping Well Model. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1007/s11242-016-0738-3.
Matos de Souza, Michelle, Oostrom, Mart, White, Mark D., Cardoso da Silva, Gerson, & Barbosa, Maria Claudia. Simulation of Subsurface Multiphase Contaminant Extraction Using a Bioslurping Well Model. United States. doi:10.1007/s11242-016-0738-3.
Matos de Souza, Michelle, Oostrom, Mart, White, Mark D., Cardoso da Silva, Gerson, and Barbosa, Maria Claudia. 2016. "Simulation of Subsurface Multiphase Contaminant Extraction Using a Bioslurping Well Model". United States. doi:10.1007/s11242-016-0738-3.
@article{osti_1322504,
title = {Simulation of Subsurface Multiphase Contaminant Extraction Using a Bioslurping Well Model},
author = {Matos de Souza, Michelle and Oostrom, Mart and White, Mark D. and Cardoso da Silva, Gerson and Barbosa, Maria Claudia},
abstractNote = {Subsurface simulation of multiphase extraction from wells is notoriously difficult. Explicit representation of well geometry requires small grid resolution, potentially leading to large computational demands. To reduce the problem dimensionality, multiphase extraction is mostly modeled using vertically-averaged approaches. In this paper, a multiphase well model approach is presented as an alternative to simplify the application. The well model, a multiphase extension of the classic Peaceman model, has been implemented in the STOMP simulator. The numerical solution approach accounts for local conditions and gradients in the exchange of fluids between the well and the aquifer. Advantages of this well model implementation include the option to simulate the effects of well characteristics and operation. Simulations were conducted investigating the effects of extraction location, applied vacuum pressure, and a number of hydraulic properties. The obtained results were all consistent and logical. A major outcome of the test simulations is that, in contrast with common recommendations to extract from either the gas-NAPL or the NAPL-aqueous phase interface, the optimum extraction location should be in between these two levels. The new model implementation was also used to simulate extraction at a field site in Brazil. The simulation shows a good match with the field data, suggesting that the new STOMP well module may correctly represent oil removal. The field simulations depend on the quality of the site conceptual model, including the porous media and contaminant properties and the boundary and extraction conditions adopted. The new module may potentially be used to design field applications and analyze extraction data.},
doi = {10.1007/s11242-016-0738-3},
journal = {Transport in Porous Media},
number = 3,
volume = 114,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 7
}
  • A numerical compositional simulator (Multiphase Multicomponent Nonisothermal Organics Transport Simulator (M[sup 2]NOTS)) has been developed for modeling transient, three-dimensional, nonisothermal, and multiphase transport of multicomponent organic contaminants in the subsurface. The governing equations include (1) advection of all three phases in response to pressure, capillary, and gravity forces; (2) interphase mass transfer that allows every component to partition into each phase present; (3) diffusion; and (4) transport of sensible and latent heat energy. Two other features distinguish M[sup 2]NOTS from other simulators reported in the groundwater literature: (1) the simulator allows for any number of chemical components and every componentmore » is allowed to partition into all fluid phases present, and (2) each phase is allowed to completely disappear from, or appear in, any region of the domain during a simulation. These features are required to model realistic field problems region of the domain during a simulation. These features are required to model realistic field problems involving transport of mixtures of nonaqueous phase liquid contaminants, and to quantify performance of existing and emerging remediation methods such as vacuum extraction and steam injection. 74 refs., 1 fig.« less
  • A finite-element method which incorporates mesh adaptation is used to calculate ground-water flow and pollutant transport. The formulation is based on the equations for conservation of mass, Darcy`s law for an anisotropic medium, and the time-dependent species transport equation. Modifications have been implemented to the finite-element formulation to enhance computational speed and reduce storage; Petrov-Galerkin weighting of the advection terms provides numerical stability. An explicit time marching scheme is used to solve the transient equations. By utilizing unstructured adaptive meshing, species concentration and location of steep fronts are accurately resolved, even though one begins with a coarse mesh. The algorithmmore » currently runs on PC and workstation class computers.« less
  • Numerical modeling has become a critical tool to the U.S. Department of Energy for evaluating the environmental impact of alternative energy sources and remediation strategies for legacy waste sites. Unfortunately, the physical and chemical complexity of many sites overwhelms the capabilities of even most “state of the art” groundwater models. Of particular concern are the representation of highly-heterogeneous stratified rock/soil layers in the subsurface and the biological and geochemical interactions of chemical species within multiple fluid phases. Clearly, there is a need for higher-resolution modeling (i.e. more spatial, temporal, and chemical degrees of freedom) and increasingly mechanistic descriptions of subsurfacemore » physicochemical processes. We present SciDAC-funded research being performed in the development of PFLOTRAN, a parallel multiphase flow and multicomponent reactive transport model. Written in Fortran90, PFLOTRAN is founded upon PETSc data structures and solvers. We are employing PFLOTRAN in the simulation of uranium transport at the Hanford 300 Area, a contaminated site of major concern to the Department of Energy, the State of Washington, and other government agencies. By leveraging the billions of degrees of freedom available through high-performance computation using tens of thousands of processors, we can better characterize the release of uranium into groundwater and its subsequent transport to the Columbia River, and thereby better understand and evaluate the effectiveness of various proposed remediation strategies.« less
  • Cylindrical (axisymmetric) flow to a well is an important specialized topic of ground-water hydraulics and has been applied by many investigators to determine aquifer properties and determine heads and flows in the vicinity of the well. A recent modification to the US Geological Survey Modular Three-Dimensional Finite-Difference Ground-Water Flow Model provides the opportunity to simulate axisymmetric flow to a well. The theory involves the conceptualization of a system of concentric shells that are capable of reproducing the large variations in gradient in the vicinity of the well decreasing their area in the direction of the well. The computer program presentedmore » serves as a preprocessor to the US Geological Survey model by creating the input data file needed to implement the axisymmetric conceptualization. Data input requirements to this preprocessor are described, and a comparison with a known analytical solution indicates that the model functions appropriately.« less