skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Atomistic clustering-ordering and high-strain deformation of an Al 0.1CrCoFeNi high-entropy alloy

Abstract

Here, computational investigations of structural, chemical, and deformation behavior in high-entropy alloys (HEAs), which possess notable mechanical strength, have been limited due to the absence of applicable force fields. To extend investigations, we propose a set of intermolecular potential parameters for a quinary Al-Cr-Co-Fe-Ni alloy, using the available ternary Embedded Atom Method and Lennard-Jones potential in classical molecular-dynamics simulations. The simulation results are validated by a comparison to first-principles Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker (KKR) - Coherent Potential Approximation (CPA) [KKR-CPA] calculations for the HEA structural properties (lattice constants and bulk moduli), relative stability, pair probabilities, and high-temperature short-range ordering. The simulation (MD)-derived properties are in quantitative agreement with KKR-CPA calculations (first-principles) and experiments. We study Al xCrCoFeNi for Al ranging from 0 ≤ x ≤2 mole fractions, and find that the HEA shows large chemical clustering over a wide temperature range for x < 0.5. At various temperatures high-strain compression promotes atomistic rearrangements in Al 0.1CrCoFeNi, resulting in a clustering-to-ordering transition that is absent for tensile loading. Large fluctuations under stress, and at higher temperatures, are attributed to the thermo-plastic instability in Al 0.1CrCoFeNi.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [1]
  1. Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)
  2. Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States)
  3. Ames Lab. and Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)
  4. The Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Ames Laboratory (AMES), Ames, IA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1321882
Report Number(s):
IS-J-8932
Journal ID: ISSN 2045-2322; srep31028
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-07CH11358
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Scientific Reports
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 6; Journal ID: ISSN 2045-2322
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE

Citation Formats

Sharma, Aayush, Singh, Prashant, Johnson, Duane D., Liaw, Peter K., and Balasubramanian, Ganesh. Atomistic clustering-ordering and high-strain deformation of an Al0.1CrCoFeNi high-entropy alloy. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1038/srep31028.
Sharma, Aayush, Singh, Prashant, Johnson, Duane D., Liaw, Peter K., & Balasubramanian, Ganesh. Atomistic clustering-ordering and high-strain deformation of an Al0.1CrCoFeNi high-entropy alloy. United States. doi:10.1038/srep31028.
Sharma, Aayush, Singh, Prashant, Johnson, Duane D., Liaw, Peter K., and Balasubramanian, Ganesh. Mon . "Atomistic clustering-ordering and high-strain deformation of an Al0.1CrCoFeNi high-entropy alloy". United States. doi:10.1038/srep31028. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1321882.
@article{osti_1321882,
title = {Atomistic clustering-ordering and high-strain deformation of an Al0.1CrCoFeNi high-entropy alloy},
author = {Sharma, Aayush and Singh, Prashant and Johnson, Duane D. and Liaw, Peter K. and Balasubramanian, Ganesh},
abstractNote = {Here, computational investigations of structural, chemical, and deformation behavior in high-entropy alloys (HEAs), which possess notable mechanical strength, have been limited due to the absence of applicable force fields. To extend investigations, we propose a set of intermolecular potential parameters for a quinary Al-Cr-Co-Fe-Ni alloy, using the available ternary Embedded Atom Method and Lennard-Jones potential in classical molecular-dynamics simulations. The simulation results are validated by a comparison to first-principles Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker (KKR) - Coherent Potential Approximation (CPA) [KKR-CPA] calculations for the HEA structural properties (lattice constants and bulk moduli), relative stability, pair probabilities, and high-temperature short-range ordering. The simulation (MD)-derived properties are in quantitative agreement with KKR-CPA calculations (first-principles) and experiments. We study AlxCrCoFeNi for Al ranging from 0 ≤ x ≤2 mole fractions, and find that the HEA shows large chemical clustering over a wide temperature range for x < 0.5. At various temperatures high-strain compression promotes atomistic rearrangements in Al0.1CrCoFeNi, resulting in a clustering-to-ordering transition that is absent for tensile loading. Large fluctuations under stress, and at higher temperatures, are attributed to the thermo-plastic instability in Al0.1CrCoFeNi.},
doi = {10.1038/srep31028},
journal = {Scientific Reports},
number = ,
volume = 6,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Aug 08 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Mon Aug 08 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 4works
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

Save / Share:
  • Structural damage and chemical segregation in Al 0.1CoCrFeNi high entropy alloy irradiated at elevated temperatures are studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atom probe tomography (APT). Irradiation-induced defects include dislocation loops, long dislocations and stacking-fault tetrahedra, but no voids can be observed. Furthermore, as irradiation temperature increases, defect density is decreased but defect size is increased, which is induced by increasing defect mobility. Finally, APT characterization reveals that ion irradiation at elevated temperatures can induce an enrichment of Ni and Co as well as a depletion of Fe and Cr at defect clusters, mainly including dislocation loops and longmore » dislocations.« less
  • Here, the mechanical behavior of a single phase (fcc) Al 0.3CoCrFeNi high-entropy alloy (HEA) was studied in the low and high strain-rate regimes. The combination of multiple strengthening mechanisms such as solid solution hardening, forest dislocation hardening, as well as mechanical twinning leads to a high work hardening rate, which is significantly larger than that for Al and is retained in the dynamic regime. The resistance to shear localization was studied by dynamically-loading hat-shaped specimens to induce forced shear localization. However, no adiabatic shear band could be observed. It is therefore proposed that the excellent strain hardening ability gives risemore » to remarkable resistance to shear localization, which makes this material an excellent candidate for penetration protection applications such as armors.« less
  • Cited by 10
  • We investigated the effects of cold rolling followed by annealing on the mechanical properties and dislocation substructure evolution of undoped and 1.1 at. % carbon-doped Fe 40.4Ni 11.3Mn 34.8Al 7.5Cr 6 high entropy alloys (HEAs). X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atom probe tomography (APT) were employed to characterize the microstructures. The as-cast HEAs were coarse-grained and single phase f.c.c., whereas the thermo-mechanical treatment caused recrystallization (to fine grain sizes) and precipitation (a B2 phase for the undoped HEA; and a B2 phase, and M 23C 6 and M 7C 3 carbides for the C-dopedmore » HEA). Carbon, which was found to have segregated to the grain boundaries using APT, retarded recrystallization. The reduction in grain size resulted in a sharp increase in strength, while the precipitation, which produced only a small increase in strength, probably accounted for the small decrease in ductility for both undoped and C-doped HEAs. For both undoped and C-doped HEAs, the smaller grain-sized material initially exhibited higher strain hardening than the coarse-grained material but showed a much lower strain hardening at large tensile strains. Wavy slip in the undoped HEAs and planar slip in C-doped HEAs were found at the early stages of deformation irrespective of grain size. At higher strains, dislocation cell structures formed in the 19 μm grain-sized undoped HEA, while microbands formed in the 23 μm grain-sized C-doped HEA. Conversely, localized dislocation clusters were found in both HEAs at the finest grain sizes (5 μm). The inhibition of grain subdivision by the grain boundaries and precipitates lead to the transformation from regular dislocation configurations consisting of dislocation-cells and microbands to irregular dislocation configurations consisting of localized dislocation clusters, which further account for the decrease in ductility. Our investigation of the formation mechanism and strain hardening of dislocation cells and microbands could benefit future structural material design.« less