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Title: Treaty Monitoring Using Seismology, with Focus on High Frequency Amplitude Models

Abstract

This is the Heiland Lecture at the Colorado School of Mines. It describes the seismological effects of nuclear testing and other high frequency amplitude occurrences.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1321660
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-16-26707
TRN: US1601887
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES; 98 NUCLEAR DISARMAMENT, SAFEGUARDS, AND PHYSICAL PROTECTION; 45 MILITARY TECHNOLOGY, WEAPONRY, AND NATIONAL DEFENSE; AMPLITUDES; LECTURES; MONITORING; COMPLIANCE; VERIFICATION; TREATIES; NUCLEAR EXPLOSION DETECTION; SEISMIC WAVES; SEISMIC EFFECTS

Citation Formats

Phillips, William Scott. Treaty Monitoring Using Seismology, with Focus on High Frequency Amplitude Models. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1321660.
Phillips, William Scott. Treaty Monitoring Using Seismology, with Focus on High Frequency Amplitude Models. United States. doi:10.2172/1321660.
Phillips, William Scott. 2016. "Treaty Monitoring Using Seismology, with Focus on High Frequency Amplitude Models". United States. doi:10.2172/1321660. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1321660.
@article{osti_1321660,
title = {Treaty Monitoring Using Seismology, with Focus on High Frequency Amplitude Models},
author = {Phillips, William Scott},
abstractNote = {This is the Heiland Lecture at the Colorado School of Mines. It describes the seismological effects of nuclear testing and other high frequency amplitude occurrences.},
doi = {10.2172/1321660},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}

Technical Report:

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